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Posts for tag: heel spurs

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
October 05, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Heel Pain   heel spurs  

Have you been experiencing any heel pain or bothersome tenderness without any obvious cause? Although heel spurs themselves sometimes do not cause acute discomfort, they are frequently associated with the painful inflammation known as plantar fasciitis, a condition commonly described as feeling like a knife is wrenching through your foot. Read below for more information on the typical causes, symptoms, and treatments of heel spurs.

What is a Heel Spur?

A heel spur is often the result of overstraining foot muscles and ligaments, overstretching the plantar fascia (the thick band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes), and repeatedly tearing the heel bone membrane. From these actions arises a calcium deposit on the underside of the heel bone. Risk factor for developing the condition include:

  • Possessing any walking gait abnormalities

  • Regularly running or jogging on hard surfaces

  • Wearing poorly fitted or overly worn shoes

  • Wearing shoes that lack arch support

  • Being excessively overweight or obese

What are The Symptoms?

Heel spurs do not carry many symptoms by themselves. However, they are often related to other afflictions, most typically plantar fasciitis. The most common sign of this combo of conditions is a feeling of chronic pain along the bottom or back of the heel, especially during periods of walking, running, or jogging. If you are experiencing this recurring inflammation, it is a good idea to visit your local podiatrist's office and inquire about undergoing an x-ray or ultrasound examination of the foot.

What are the Treatment Options?

The solutions to heel spurs are generally centered around decreasing inflammation and avoiding re-injury. They include:

  • Applying ice on the inflammation

  • Performing stretch exercises

  • Wearing orthotic devices or shoe inserts to relieve pressure off of the spur

  • Taking anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen to relieve pain

  • In extreme cases, surgery can be performed on chronically inflamed spurs

If you are dealing with symptoms of heel spurs or pain in your feet, turn to a podiatrist so that we can get you back on your feet. Don't ignore your pain.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
February 08, 2018
Category: Exercise injury

In a physically challenging sport such as aerobics, injuries are common, and often involve the foot, ankle, and lower leg. Podiatrists say that most injuries from aerobics result from improper shoes, surfaces, or routines, and overuse of muscles through too vigorous a regimen. This can be detrimental to the foot, ankle, and legs as they need a lot of protection when they are constantly in use. If the feet and ankles are not protected, they can suffer from disorders such as bunions, heel spurs, plantar fasciitis, shin splints and more.

If you are attending an aerobics class, make sure it is led by a certified instructor. Hardwood floors, especially with padded mats, are the best surfaces possible for the feet and body during the high impact of the activity. If you can, start with a multi-impact class where you can start at a low-impact level and work your way up as your conditioning improves. This will allow your feet and ankles to get used to the vigorous activity and build up a tolerance. Be sure to give the feet and ankles breaks in between classes so that they can rest and heal.

Exercising at home with a video can be cost-efficient, but it is still important to be very careful. Read the label to determine whether the video is produced by certified aerobics instructors and whether you can handle the degree of impact. While it's safe to do low-to-moderate impact aerobics on the living room carpet, that's not a proper surface for high-impact routines. At-home aerobics can cause an array of foot and ankle problems if you have not done it before.

Any time you partake in aerobics, be sure to include a proper warm-up period. Make sure there are no rapid, violent movements. Knees should always be loose during warm-up. A static stretch held for 10 seconds can help avoid overstretching injuries as well.

Drink adequate water to avoid dehydration during workouts. Dehydration can cause nausea, dizziness, muscle fatigue, and cramping. For exercise lasting longer than 45 minutes, a sports nutrition drink may be superior to water.

Don't underestimate the importance of the cool-off period. It burns off lactic acid (which makes muscles feel tired) and adrenaline while keeping blood from pooling in the extremities.

Be sure to start slow. Unless you have been doing aerobics all of your life, it is not likely that you will be able to keep the pace of a professional who does it every day, multiple times a day. Be sure to invest in the proper equipment and footwear prior to the start of your regimen to prevent injury. If you do injure yourself while partaking in the activity, see a podiatrist right away. Immediate treatment of foot and ankle problems can prevent severe problems down the road. Call Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC located in Chandler, Arizona. Call 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today. Don’t let the fear of an aerobic injury prevent you from enjoying it.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
May 10, 2017
Category: Foot Care

While Aerobic exercise is known for bringing a plethora of health benefits it has its risks too. Aerobic classes have blossomed into a sport over decades and is a great way to lose weight and keep in shape. Whether it be low impact or high intensity one must make sure to wear the correct shoes to support each move. Your feet take the brunt of impact because this sport requires quick movements, jumping and leaping for a lengthy amount of time. Which is why these tips should be considered before taking your next class.

Shoe tips to prevent injury during Aerobics:

  • If your feet suffer from pronation (when your ankles turn inward or outward) you should control harmful motions with an orthotic shoe insert.
  • Because of the many side to side steps your shoes should have a good arch design that provides the best stability.
  • Your shoes should have a large toe box so that there is enough room to prevent irritation of toes and nails.
  • Purchase shoes in the afternoon when your feet are likely to swell the most and wear the same socks that you will use during your class.

Basic tips to prevent foot and ankle injury:

  • Make sure the surface you are using is stable and has padded mats when the movement requires a soft floor.
  • Stretch before and after your routine to avoid over using any muscles.
  • Confirm that your instructor is certified and understands any prior injuries or restrictions you may have.
  • If you are using a video at home make sure you apply the same rules to ensure foot and ankle safety.

Some common aerobic injuries are Plantar Fasciitis, Heel Spurs, Achilles Tendonitis and Stress Fractures, but the bottom line is to be careful and responsible. Injuries will inevitably occur if you don’t listen to your body and use your common sense when it comes to safety. There are good aerobic programs and bad ones so use your discretion and pace yourself when it comes to pain. If you are having any pain in your feet and ankles call our office at 480-732-0033 and schedule an appointment. Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC has an office in Chandler Arizona and Alan J. Discont DPM is ready to help get you the right regiment to keep your feet and ankles safe.

 

By Family Foot and Ankle Care, PC
November 15, 2016
Category: Foot Conditions

For some women, there’s nothing quite as exciting as getting a brand new pair of elegant high heels. High heels come in a number of attractive high heels injurystyles, including pumps, stilettos, wedges, Mary Janes, platforms and sling backs. But those pretty heels can hide some pretty ugly truths. Take a moment to learn more about the hidden dangers of high heels and how they can cause serious problems for your feet.

Heel Spurs

Heel spurs are bumps that form on the heel bone over time due to continuous friction or pressure. The design of many high heeled shoes puts a strain on the back of the foot, leading to complications with heel spurs and irritation of the skin.

Ankle Injury

Women who wear very high heels also put their ankles at risk of injury. If the wearer falls or has a sudden movement in the wrong direction, it could cause a sprained ankle. The higher the heel, the worse the potential effects of a fall.

Hammertoes

One of the most commonly reported problems that podiatrists receive from women who wear high heels is the appearance of hammertoes. A hammertoe develops as the toes are pinched and squeezed forward in the front of the heel—the toes begin to bend at the joints into an unnatural shape. In some cases, the joints are aggravated to the point where the wearer can no longer bend the toes back up.

Corns and Calluses

Hammertoes are often seen in combination with unsightly corns that develop on the tops of the toes due to friction with the shoe. Calluses also often develop on the sides of the feet and on the bottom, where the ball of the feet meets the ground each time you take a step.

As gorgeous as those high heels on the rack may look, it’s also important to think about how your feet could look after a while if you wear them often. If you enjoy wearing high heels, protect your feet by maintaining regular appointments with your podiatrist. A number of modern solutions and foot therapies are available, so if you have any of the symptoms mentioned above, call your podiatrist today to schedule an urgent consultation.

According to a study conducted by scientists at Guangzhou Dongsheng Hospital and Guangzhou Social Welfare House, acupuncture is an effective treatment for heel pain. Sixty-six patients with some developed form of heel pain were used as a part of the experiment directed by researcher Xu Xuemeng and his team. The control group was compromised of participants that were given experiment drugs and the rest of the patients were given a filiform acupuncture needle treatment.

Within six months, the participants that had received acupuncture had an effectiveness rating of 97% while the effectiveness rating of the control group was just 76%. Acupuncture has been especially effective for those suffering from Achilles tendonitis and plantar fasciitis.

Heel pain can become troublesome and debilitating after time. If you are suffering from heel pain, see podiatrist Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and provide you with quality treatment.   

Causes of Heel Pain

● Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

● Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

● Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

- Wearing ill-fitting shoes                 
- Wearing non-supportive shoes
- Weight change          
- Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a thing of the past.

With the advancements in technology and greater knowledge of how muscles and joints work, physical therapists can turn things around dramatically.  

If you have any questions, please contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Heel Pain