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Posts for tag: Swelling

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
September 26, 2018
Category: infections
Tags: Swelling   Ulcer   ingrown toenail   irritation  

Are persistent infections getting you down? At Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC, we want to share a few tips and tricks to help you get your infection treated and to help prevent infections from developing or recurring in the future. Our doctors Dr. Alan J. Discont, Dr. Gregory M. Krahn, and Dr. Boyd Andrews are here to help.

If you’ve ever had an ingrown toenail or a foot ulcer, you’re likely familiar with the risk of infection and how troublesome an infection can be once it has developed. When you have an infection on your feet or ankles, it will take on a distinct appearance:

  • Swelling - the affected area will appear swollen and larger than usual.
  • Redness - swelling is often accompanied by redness, signaling irritation.
  • Painful - if the affected area is experiencing redness, it is likely to be tender to touch as well.
  • Warm - areas that are painful, swollen, and red are often also warm to the touch.
  • Pus - a definite sign of infection is the combination of all the above symptoms accompanied by pus and discharge, which may be yellow or red in color.

When it comes to treatment options, there is limited room for a DIY do-it-yourself approach. Infections can get ugly quickly! While it might be easy to treat it when it’s caught early on, infections spread quickly and dealing with the discomfort for longer than you need to is unpleasant. Here are your options:

  • DIY - the do-it-yourself option is to soak the affected area in warm water. For added benefit, try using Epsom salts in the water as well. Soaking for 10-15 minutes at a time can help draw out the infection - but make sure you sanitize your tub after each use!
  • Medication - depending on the type, location, and severity of the infection, your podiatrist might prescribe antibiotics to address your foot problem.
  • Relax - whether you do-it-yourself or decide to soak before seeing your podiatrist, try to relax! Staying off of the affected area is not only more comfortable but will help avoid future irritation.

If you’re searching for a podiatry practice focused around family care, you’ve found your foot doctor! Give us a call today at 408-732-0033 to schedule an appointment at our location in Chandler, Arizona.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
August 10, 2018

You’re walking along your favorite walking trail one day and take an unintentionally careless step up onto a stone stairway. You slip and feel your ankle both twist and impact with the ground. It hurts a lot, and you think you might have broken your foot but then you remember that severe ankle sprains are known to feel worse than actually breaking your foot. How do you know, at that moment, if your foot is broken or if it’s sprained?

The first step when you know you’ve hurt your ankle is to R.E.S.T. until you’re able to seek medical attention. This stands for rest, ice, compression, and elevation. Stay off the affected foot, ice it for 20 minutes at a time, use a compression sleeve if it’s not too painful, and elevate the affected foot to reduce swelling.

When you get to see a medical professional about your hurt ankle, describe in great detail how it happened. What happened right before you fell? What kind of material did you fall onto? What type of shoes were you wearing? All of this information can be helpful to the doctor in determining if your ankle is broken or if it is sprained.

Depending on when and how you have fallen, the development of bruising and swelling can tell you a lot about your injury. Did the bruise come on really quickly? This can possibly signal a break, but it could also simply mean that you hit your foot harder than you thought. Look at your foot - is it misshapen at all? It can be hard to tell if the swelling has come on fast, but provides clues for us.

Though it can prove difficult to tell at the moment if your foot is broken or sprained, one of the most tell-tale symptoms of a break is numbness. If you feel numbness in part of or in your entire foot, chances are higher that you’ve experienced a fracture. In either case, don’t wait to seek medical attention! During your healing process, it’s important to follow up with your podiatrist for long-term care and pain management. Dr. Alan J. Discont, Dr. Gregory M. Krahn, and Dr. Boyd Andrews at Family Foot & Ankle Care can help you prevent or reduce the impact of a break or sprain on the long-term health of your feet and ankles! Call us today at (408) 732-0033 to schedule your next appointment at our office in Chandler, Arizona.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
July 25, 2018
Category: Foot surgery
Tags: Swelling   Bunion   pain   bones   surgeries  

In many cases, a bunion can be a mild inconvenience, but some bunions begin to grow out of control and cause a lot of pain and suffering in the foot. When a bunion causes so much pain and suffering in the foot that a person can not function regularly, then it is time to consider foot surgery.

What Is a Bunion?

A bunion develops when excess bone growth occurs outside of the joint of your big toe. In many cases, this causes your big toe to turn inward toward your other toes and creates a bump on the side of the big toe. Other symptoms a bunion can produce are inflammation, swelling, pain and problems moving around. Bunions develop in many cases due to improperly fitting shoes that place pressure on the toe and move it out of place, or because of poor genetics.

In many cases, bunions can be treated without surgery by changing footwear and using orthotics. If the bunion is too severe surgery may be the best option.

Types of Surgeries

Osteotomy is a procedure where the foot surgeon makes small cuts into the bones. The surgeon does this to make space so that he or she can realign the foot properly.  He or she may use pins to hold the bones in the corrected position while you heal. These pins can be removed later on at the recommendation of the foot surgeon.

Exostectomy is a procedure where the foot surgeon extracts the extra bone that makes up the bunion on the joint of the toe. Exostectomy is often used in conjunction with an osteotomy to correct the alignment of the toe.

Traditional surgeries call for large incisions that open up the entire foot for the foot doctor to view. With new modern technologies, there are many minimally invasive options available that only require small incisions to be made in the foot. In most cases, a foot surgeon or podiatrist will recommend a surgery that is minimally invasive as it also has a shorter recuperation window and patients tend to heal better with these types of surgeries.

If you have a bunion that is out of control, call Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC located in Chandler, Arizona. The number is 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today. 

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
July 19, 2018
Category: toe pain
Tags: Arthritis   Swelling   Podiatrist   Sports  

Notice that your feet have been under a lot of pressure and pain lately? Do they ache constantly and make it hard to walk around? This could be a sign of a foot condition known as arthritis. Most people assume arthritis can occur only in the ankle, but actually, it can occur anywhere there is a joint. What this means is that you could also be suffering from arthritis pain in your toes. This is because the toes have joints, so they are just as susceptible to the condition.

Arthritis is a term that can be used broadly. There are multiple types of arthritis that can occur in the toe. It could simply be arthritis due to the cartilage wearing away which allows the bones to rub together, or it could be from a different type of arthritis.

So, What Is It?

Toe arthritis is the inflammation of the toe joint. More often than not, it affects the big toe. The other toes can be affected as well. Broken or sprained toes, gout, and osteoporosis can all cause toe arthritis.

Who Is at Risk?

Those who are overweight, are fifty-five and older, have suffered a traumatic past injury, are or were in sports, or who have a family history of arthritis are at risk.

Symptoms

The first symptom of toe arthritis is pain. At first, it can be general discomfort, but over time it can increase to extreme unbearable pain. Another common symptom of this condition is stiffness in the joint. The stiffer the joint, the harder it is to move. Swelling is another symptom of arthritis of the toe. This particular symptom can make it hard for you to fit into your shoes. Clicking and popping noises are the fourth symptom of arthritis. These sounds are caused by the deterioration of cartilage in the joints.

Other symptoms can also occur when you have toe arthritis. In general, if your toe starts to be painful, look different or feel different, then it is time to see your podiatrist. Arthritis isn’t the only problem your toe could be facing. Call Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC located in Chandler, Arizona. The number is 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today. Arthritis can be debilitating – let us help you get back on your feet.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
May 23, 2018
Category: Sports injuries
Tags: Ankle Sprains   Swelling   Podiatrist   Injury   ice hockey   x-ray   tightness  

Ice hockey is well known as one of the world’s fastest and most dangerous sports. Not only are players skating at high speeds around the rink in the chase of a puck, but they are also checking into each other which is very similar to that of a football tackle on ice. Because of the fast-paced game and constant contact, it is easy for any player to skate off the ice with a foot or ankle injury. As we watch the Stanley Cup playoffs and root for our favorite players, keep in mind some of the most common hockey injuries before you get out and give it a shot yourself.

What Makes It Dangerous

In general, there are two types of injuries a hockey player can experience. The first is a high-speed injury caused by a smaller mass object. This can cause cuts, bruises, and concussions. It can also cause stress fractures. The second type of injury that is common is a low speed, high mass injury. This injury can be from a collision with the boards or a person. These collisions tend to cause sprains and fractures of the foot and ankle.

Ankle Injuries

Ankle sprains are a common occurrence in hockey. This is usually due to collisions with others and the boards. These collisions can cause a hockey player to lose balance and roll their ankle within their skate. Sometimes their padding can help to prevent this type of sprain but other times players are not so lucky. Th we sprain cause pain immediately and this pain is usually found in the deltoid ligament. A podiatrist will take an x-ray to confirm the sprain and then take appropriate measures to help the sprain such as immobilization, ice and anti-inflammatory medications.

Skate Bites

The skate bite is another common ankle injury that occurs in hockey players. This injury is characterized by inflammation of the tendon that crosses over the sheath of the foot. Skate bites are caused due to excessive pressure from skate laces. When you lace your skates, you usually keep them tight up at the top by the ankle. This helps to prevent rolling of the ankle and ankle injury. Unfortunately, the tightness can cause skate bite. Players will feel aching of their foot when they skate. After playing, they will see swelling and be in more pain. This condition can be managed with added cushioning in the skate as well as regular checkups with your podiatrist.

Playing hockey is a great way to get and stay in shape as well as partake in a team-building environment. If you are injured while playing hockey, be sure to contact your podiatrist right away. Call Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC located in Chandler, Arizona. Call 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today.