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Posts for tag: Stress Fractures

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
May 10, 2017
Category: Foot Care

While Aerobic exercise is known for bringing a plethora of health benefits it has its risks too. Aerobic classes have blossomed into a sport over decades and is a great way to lose weight and keep in shape. Whether it be low impact or high intensity one must make sure to wear the correct shoes to support each move. Your feet take the brunt of impact because this sport requires quick movements, jumping and leaping for a lengthy amount of time. Which is why these tips should be considered before taking your next class.

Shoe tips to prevent injury during Aerobics:

  • If your feet suffer from pronation (when your ankles turn inward or outward) you should control harmful motions with an orthotic shoe insert.
  • Because of the many side to side steps your shoes should have a good arch design that provides the best stability.
  • Your shoes should have a large toe box so that there is enough room to prevent irritation of toes and nails.
  • Purchase shoes in the afternoon when your feet are likely to swell the most and wear the same socks that you will use during your class.

Basic tips to prevent foot and ankle injury:

  • Make sure the surface you are using is stable and has padded mats when the movement requires a soft floor.
  • Stretch before and after your routine to avoid over using any muscles.
  • Confirm that your instructor is certified and understands any prior injuries or restrictions you may have.
  • If you are using a video at home make sure you apply the same rules to ensure foot and ankle safety.

Some common aerobic injuries are Plantar Fasciitis, Heel Spurs, Achilles Tendonitis and Stress Fractures, but the bottom line is to be careful and responsible. Injuries will inevitably occur if you don’t listen to your body and use your common sense when it comes to safety. There are good aerobic programs and bad ones so use your discretion and pace yourself when it comes to pain. If you are having any pain in your feet and ankles call our office at 480-732-0033 and schedule an appointment. Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC has an office in Chandler Arizona and Alan J. Discont DPM is ready to help get you the right regiment to keep your feet and ankles safe.

 

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
February 16, 2017
Category: Foot Care

Find out how to prevent and treat running injuries.

If athletes could have it their way, they would enjoy every mile of their run without experiencing any pain, discomfort or soreness. While this running injuriessounds ideal, it’s sadly not the reality we live in. With uneven and sometimes rough and rocky terrain, runners face a variety of conditions that are tough on their feet and ankles and can cause serious issues. Here are some of the most common running injuries we see and what you can do about them.

Achilles Tendinitis

This condition often occurs because of repeated stress or overuse and affects the Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscles to the back of the heel. When a runner develops Achilles tendinitis, this means the tendon is irritated and often stiff.

  • Risk Factors: This condition is usually the result of a sudden increase in training, which can put unnecessary pressure on your calves. While it’s great to push yourself during your workout, you must create realistic goals to prevent injuries.
  • Care: You will want to rest whenever you can and elevate your foot. Apply ice for 10 to 20 minutes a day, several times a day. Also, perform strengthening and stretching exercises like heel drops, and opt for low-­impact cardio instead.
  • Workout Impact: If you notice pain during or after your run you need to halt all activities until your injury is better. This is certainly not a condition that you want to continue to work out with. If you stop your workouts while the condition is still minor, you will have a faster healing time than someone who continues to work out through the pain.

Stress Fractures

Repeated stress and overtraining are the two main causes of these fractures, which can be caused by increasing your workout intensity or duration too fast. They are one of the most serious conditions that runners face.

  • Risk Factors: However, those who’ve been running longer are less at risk for stress fractures than those who just started. Women are also more prone to stress fractures than men, often due to a lack of sufficient calorie intake or other nutritional deficits.
  • Care: Stay off your foot until you can walk without pain. Once this happens, you can slowly incorporate jogging into your routine. You can use OTC pain relievers and anti-inflammatory medications to relieve pain and swelling. Talk to your podiatrist about whether you may need crutches.
  • Workout Impact: Do not workout while you have a stress fracture. You should take anywhere from eight to 16 weeks away from your workouts. This, of course, will depend on the severity of your fracture. Again, opt for swimming or other low-­impact sports in the meantime.

If you ever experience severe or chronic pain in your feet or ankles it’s important to contact your podiatrist right away. While at-­home care can certainly alleviate your symptoms, if your symptoms affect your day­to­day activities, then it’s time to seek medical attention.

By Family Foot and Ankle Care, PC
October 17, 2016
Category: Foot Care

The metatarsal area is one of the most common sites for stress fractures. This article discusses the causes and treatments for these fractures.Metatarsal Stress Fractures

Stress fractures anywhere on the body are caused by repeated forceful activity. Considering that the feet bear a person's body weight for much of the day, they are very susceptible to stress fractures. The long bones in the feet, the metatarsals, are particularly prone to these injuries. But how are they diagnosed, treated and prevented?

Why metatarsal stress fractures happen

Certain activities or conditions can make stress fracturing the metatarsal bones more likely. Athletes who run, dance, or jump are at risk, as are those who suddenly boost their activity level after a long period of idleness. Osteoporosis (a disorder that causes weakness and brittleness of the bones) can also increase the likelihood of stress fractures.

Diagnosis and treatment

Widespread foot pain is usually the first sign of a metatarsal stress fracture. It may disappear with rest at first, but over time, the pain will be continual and concentrated into a specific area of the foot. Because stress fractures can be extremely small, an x-ray may not immediately detect it. Bone scans or MRIs are often more accurate. Special footwear can take the pressure off of the affected area and allow the fracture to heal. Depending on the location of the fracture, a cast may be applied and crutches may be required.

Prevention

Properly-fitted, quality footwear should always be worn during activity to support the feet. Alternating your activities (instead of focusing on one particular, repetitive action) will help to distribute the movements evenly. Diets rich in calcium and Vitamin D will help maintain bone integrity. It is also important to start any new physical activity slowly and work up at a gradual pace.

If you have been experiencing foot pain and believe it may be caused by a metatarsal stress fracture, contact your podiatrist for an evaluation today.

There are a lot of health risks that come along with wearing high heels. High heels point the toes downward, which loads feet with the full weight of the bodies. As a result, foot, leg, and back muscles are forced out of alignment, and this causes damage to other parts of the body. They can also cause stress fractures due to the excessive pressure being put on the ball of the foot. Heel pain is another issue commonly experienced by women who wear high heels. It is important to weigh the advantages and disadvantages of heels before deciding to wear them.

High heels can create a myriad of foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet consult with Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because they are associated with femininity.  Despite their appeal, they can cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

What parts my body will be affected by high heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – may shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – they decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  Also, the vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What kinds of foot problems can develop from wearing high heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How can I still wear high heels and maintain foot health?

 If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock; you can buy either full inserts or metatarsal pads. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about the effects of high heels.

The San Francisco 49ers new starting cornerback, Kenneth Acker, received his opportunity to step up last summer when he had a strong training camp as a rookie. He was unfortunately placed on the season-ending injured reserve before the beginning of the regular season, however, when he suffered a stress fracture in his foot. “I think that year off, knowing that I wanted to be on the field of course, it helped me a lot,” said Acker. "It just put me in a position where I was comfortable with coming into the position. It wasn’t like it was my first time out there."  

Stress fractures can become painful if left untreated for an extended period of time. If you would like assistance in treating a stress fracture, consult with Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont can determine the severity of your condition and provide you with quality care.

Coping with Podiatric Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures occur on the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken as a result of overexertion or underuse.  As a result, the ankles and feet lose support when walking or running from the ground. Since these bones are not protected, they receive the full impact of each step. The stress on the feet causes the bones to form cracks.

What are Stress Fractures?

Stress Fractures are very common among those who are highly active and involved in sports or activities that make excessive use of their legs and feet. Stress fractures are especially common among:

-athletes (gymnasts, tennis players, basketball players)
-runners/joggers
-osteoporosis patients
-those who engage in high-intensity workouts

Stress Fracture Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures, and can be either constant or periodic. The pain is usually sharp or dull, accompanied by swelling and tenderness. Engagement in any kind of high impact activity will exacerbate the pain.

If you have any questions, please contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Stress Fractures