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Posts for tag: Running

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
February 16, 2017
Category: Foot Care

Find out how to prevent and treat running injuries.

If athletes could have it their way, they would enjoy every mile of their run without experiencing any pain, discomfort or soreness. While this running injuriessounds ideal, it’s sadly not the reality we live in. With uneven and sometimes rough and rocky terrain, runners face a variety of conditions that are tough on their feet and ankles and can cause serious issues. Here are some of the most common running injuries we see and what you can do about them.

Achilles Tendinitis

This condition often occurs because of repeated stress or overuse and affects the Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscles to the back of the heel. When a runner develops Achilles tendinitis, this means the tendon is irritated and often stiff.

  • Risk Factors: This condition is usually the result of a sudden increase in training, which can put unnecessary pressure on your calves. While it’s great to push yourself during your workout, you must create realistic goals to prevent injuries.
  • Care: You will want to rest whenever you can and elevate your foot. Apply ice for 10 to 20 minutes a day, several times a day. Also, perform strengthening and stretching exercises like heel drops, and opt for low-­impact cardio instead.
  • Workout Impact: If you notice pain during or after your run you need to halt all activities until your injury is better. This is certainly not a condition that you want to continue to work out with. If you stop your workouts while the condition is still minor, you will have a faster healing time than someone who continues to work out through the pain.

Stress Fractures

Repeated stress and overtraining are the two main causes of these fractures, which can be caused by increasing your workout intensity or duration too fast. They are one of the most serious conditions that runners face.

  • Risk Factors: However, those who’ve been running longer are less at risk for stress fractures than those who just started. Women are also more prone to stress fractures than men, often due to a lack of sufficient calorie intake or other nutritional deficits.
  • Care: Stay off your foot until you can walk without pain. Once this happens, you can slowly incorporate jogging into your routine. You can use OTC pain relievers and anti-inflammatory medications to relieve pain and swelling. Talk to your podiatrist about whether you may need crutches.
  • Workout Impact: Do not workout while you have a stress fracture. You should take anywhere from eight to 16 weeks away from your workouts. This, of course, will depend on the severity of your fracture. Again, opt for swimming or other low-­impact sports in the meantime.

If you ever experience severe or chronic pain in your feet or ankles it’s important to contact your podiatrist right away. While at-­home care can certainly alleviate your symptoms, if your symptoms affect your day­to­day activities, then it’s time to seek medical attention.

By Family Foot and Ankle Care, PC
December 02, 2016
Category: Foot Care

Consider the health of your feet the next time you purchase your running shoes.

If you are an avid runner, nothing sounds better than lacing up your shoes and spending the day outdoors. However, do you think about the proper running shoeshealth of your feet while you are running your favorite trails? Are you considering how much protection your feet are getting or the stability they need while you pound the pavement? Our feet and ankles play a major role in our ability to enjoy active endeavors like running. Therefore, when it’s time to pick out a new pair of running shoes, here are some tips you should follow.

Figure out your foot type

Do you have flat feet or high arches? When you go in to try on running shoes, go to an athletic store where specialists and experts can help you choose the proper running shoes to fit your foot shape. By choosing shoes based on the arch of your foot, you can easily prevent certain injuries.

Do you pronate?

How your foot hits the ground while you move will also affect the type of shoes you purchase. Those with flat feet often overpronate, which means that the foot rolls severely inward every time your foot hits the ground. Whenever the foot rolls inward it causes pain and strain to the foot. By going to a specialty running store you can talk to someone who will be able to determine whether you pronate so you get the best running shoes for your feet.

By a half size up

This might sound a bit odd, but did you know that your feet actually swell while you run? Therefore, if your shoes just fit or even fit a little snug, this can cause blisters and other foot problems due to overcrowded toes. In order to combat swollen feet, it’s not a bad idea to go up a half size in your shoes than you normally would.

Know when to replace your old shoes

No one likes to say goodbye to their old running shoes, especially if a lot of great memories were formed and races were won while wearing them; however, shoes don’t last forever and the longer you wear worn­out shoes the more damaging it could be for your feet. A good rule of thumb is to replace your shoes every 300 to 500 miles.

If you have any questions about what running shoe is best for you, call your podiatrist today!

Picking out the right running shoe can be a daunting task for many runners, who are often left overwhelmed by the numerous options available for purchase. Unless you are suffering from a certain condition, the best option may be to select a supportive but neutral shoe. To begin, running coach James Dunne states, “Find somewhere that will let you try a few pairs on and don’t get too drawn into whatever is the new ‘hype’ in trainers, go for something that’s tried and tested. Unless you’ve got a specific reason to need a particularly supportive shoe, I’d just go for a firm but neutral shoe, as a starting point.”   

If you are a runner, wearing the right running shoe is essential. For more information, see Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont can treat your foot and ankle needs.

Choosing the Right Running Shoe for Your Foot Type

To increase performance and avoid the risk of injury, it is important to choose the right running shoe based on your foot type. The general design of running shoes revolves around pronation, which is how the ankle rolls from outside to inside when the foot strikes the ground.

  • Neutral runners are able to choose from a wide variety of shoes, including minimalist shoes or even go barefoot
  • Runners who overpronate, or experience an over-abundance of ankle rolling, should choose shoes that provide extra motion control and stability
  • Runners who underpronate, or supinate, have feet that have high arches and lack flexibility, preventing shock absorption. They require shoes with more flexibility and cushion

If you have any questions, please contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Choosing the Right Running Shoe

In the past, Australian John Leha was once overweight and caught in the throes of grief and depression. Several months later, however, Leha was able to turn his life around and is now running in the New York Marathon. Following the death of his brother Tohi from cancer two years ago, Leha fell into depression and began binge eating. His weight became the equivalent of two average-sized men. Fighting out of his depression, Lega signed up for the Indigenous Marathon Project, which takes young Indigenous Australians and prepares them for the New York City Marathon. “If I really think about all the reasons why I’m doing it,” Leha shares, “my purpose, it’s my purpose that keeps me going.”  

Maintaining a healthy weight and an active lifestyle can promote not only foot health, but overall health. To learn more, speak with Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will provide you with quality podiatric care. 

Obesity and your Feet

Since your feet are what support your entire weight when standing, any additional weight can result in pain and swelling. Being overweight is one of the main contributors to foot complications.

Problems & Complications

Extra Weight – Even putting on just a few extra pounds could create serious complications for your feet. As your weight increases, your balance and body will shift, creating new stresses on your feet. This uneven weight distribution can cause pain, even while doing the simplest tasks, such as walking.

Diabetes – People who are overweight are at serious risk of developing type-2 diabetes, which has a drastic impact on the health of your feet. As you get older, your diabetes might worsen, which could lead to loss of feeling in your feet, sores, and bruises. You could also become more prone to various infections.

Plantar fasciitis – Pressure and stress that is placed on muscles, joints, and tendons can trigger plantar fasciitis, which is an inflammation of tissue that forms along the bottom of the foot. 

If you have any questions, please contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Obesity and Your Feet

Barefoot RunningRunning barefoot and running with modest cushioning is said to yield the same running economy. According to a published piece by Rodger Kram in  Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, shoe cushioning spares the leg muscles just enough to balance out the zero-weight saving  from no shoes.  

The study had 12 subjects in the experiment run barefoot, and later with a Nike phylon midsole foam affixed to the treadmill. Results showed runners’ metabolic power improved on the foam compared to the no-foam. In another test, results showed no difference when runners ran on the treadmill with shoes or barefoot.  “It appears that the positive effects of shoe cushioning counteracted the negative effects of added mass,” said Kram.      

Allowing your body time to adjust properly to barefoot running is essential, and part of this preventative care involves talking to a podiatrist like Dr. Alan Discont of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC. Dr. Discont can advise you on a running regimen, as well as provide information on techniques of barefoot running to help avoid foot pain, heel pain, and injury.

Barefoot Running

Barefoot Running Impact

-Running without shoes changes the motion of your running
-Running barefoot requires landing be done on the front part of the feet as opposed to the heel

Barefoot Running Advantages

-Running and landing on the front feet reduces the impact on the knees and ankles
-It strengthens muscles in the feet and ankles and the lower legs.
-Balance of the body is improved
-Greater sensory input from the feet to the rest of the body.

Barefoot Running Disadvantages

-No protection while running results in cuts and bruises if the runner lands on something sharp.
-Blisters may form.
-Possibility of plantar fascia problems.
-Risk of getting Achilles tendonitis.

So what can runners do to make barefoot running safe? It’s best to make a slow transition from running shoes to barefoot running. Once the feet begin to adjust, try walking, then jogging and gradually increasing the distance. Minimalist running shoes may also be an option.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our two offices which are located in Sun Lakes or Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read the full article on Barefoot Running.