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Posts for tag: Rest

By Alan J. Discont, DPM, FACFAS
January 23, 2014
Tags: Rest   Foot Injuries   RICE   Ice   Compression   Elevation  

Common Foot InjuriesAn unexpected fall or twist can result in an injury of the foot or ankle, such as a sprain or strain. Immediate first aid can help prevent complications, reduce pain and improve recovery.

Rest, ice, compression, and elevation, commonly referred to as R.I.C.E., is the first and best treatment for minor injuries. The following tips can aid in the early treatment of common foot and ankle injuries to help reduce swelling and control the inflammatory process during the initial phase of injury.

Rest.   Whether you have a strain or a sprain, rest from any physical activity is essential to protecting your injured ligaments, tendons or muscles from further damage while your body starts the repair process.  Avoid putting weight on the injured foot or ankle as much as possible. In some cases, complete immobilization may be required.

Ice.  Gently ice your foot or ankle with ice wrapped in a towel in a 20-minute-on, 40-minute-off cycle for the first few days post-injury. Ice is excellent at reducing inflammation and pain. 

Compression. Applying some type of compressive wrap or bandage to an injured area can greatly reduce the amount of initial swelling.

Elevation.  Prop your foot up while lying down or sitting so that it is higher than or equal to the level of the heart.

After a few days of R.I.C.E., many acute injuries will begin to heal. If pain or swelling does not subside after a few days or if you are unsure of the severity of your injury, make an appointment with your Chandler podiatrist.   A skilled podiatrist can properly diagnose your injury and recommend the best course of treatment.

SesamoiditisAccording to his doctors, AFL prospect Matthew Scharenberg has been diagnosed with sesamoiditis in both of his feet.

Unfortunately this means that Scharenberg, who was to enter the AFL in 2014, has an uncertain future.

Regarding his condition Scharenberg said, "It's sesamoiditis - the sesamoid bone in each foot is just a little inflamed and I've been told to rest," he said. "They (the feet) are not too bad. I'm just giving them a rest at the moment (and) just taking it each week at a time right now." Scharenberg still remains optimistic in spite of his diagnosis. "I'm confident (it won't be a problem) … absolutely. Injuries are a part of football.”

Sesamoiditis is an injury that occurs commonly in sports players and can be very painful. If you are suffering from foot pain and think it could be sesamoiditis, contact a podiatrist like Dr. Alan Discont of Family Foot and Ankle Care, PC. Dr. Discont can determine the cause of your pain and treat your condition quickly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

· Sudden increase in activity

· Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up

· Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to fit your needs.

Read more about Sesamoiditis.