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Posts for tag: Plantar Fasciitis

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
April 03, 2019
Category: Foot Care
The human foot and ankle contain 33 joints, 26 bones and over 100 tendons, ligaments and muscles. While all of these parts of the foot should work together, there are certain conditions, injuries and diseases that can affect the health and functioning of your foot or ankle. There are many instances in which you should turn to a podiatrist for individualized care that you can trust time and time again.
 
From routine visits to managing long-term conditions to surgery, a podiatrist is equipped to treat just about everything. Here are some foot issues that could benefit from coming in for specialized care:
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Achilles tendinitis
  • Heel pain
  • Ankle sprains and fractures
  • Foot fractures
  • Sports-related injuries
  • Bunions and hammertoes
  • Corns and calluses
  • Diabetic foot care
  • Fungal infections
  • Ingrown toenails
  • Heel spurs
Our number one goal is to provide you with the relief that you need. Whether you are suffering from heel pain or you think your feet could benefit from prescription orthotics, a podiatrist can help determine the best course of action for treating your issues. When you come into our office we will always have a listening ear, so that we understand your questions and concerns. 
 
We also like to provide our patients with the very latest and greatest technologies and techniques. We understand the importance of options and being able to provide laser treatments and other non-surgical therapies to treat conditions is important to our patients. Whether you are an athlete or 9-5er, we treat clients with a host of different needs, lifestyles and issues. Everyone from children to senior citizens can benefit from the unique and customized foot care a podiatrist offers.
 
We are here to help diagnose, treat or manage your foot condition. If you are dealing with foot or ankle problems contact your podiatrist for help.
By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
March 06, 2019
Category: Foot Conditions
Is heel pain keeping you down? Pain that occurs following an injury or early in an illness may play a protective role, warning us about the damage we have suffered. SoYour Heel Pain Could Be Plantar Fasciitis what causes heel pain?
 
Plantar fasciitis is a foot condition in which a band of tissue in the sole of the foot becomes inflamed, leading to severe heel pain. The pain can be so bad that it hurts to walk, much less exercise or perform daily activities. If one step causes shooting pain in your heel—especially when you first get out of bed in the morning or stand up after sitting for a long period of time—plantar fasciitis may be to blame. Contact your podiatrist immediately for proper diagnosis and treatment of your pain. 
 

Understanding Heel Pain with Help from Your Podiatrist

Plantar fasciitis, or heel pain, occurs when the plantar fascia is strained over time beyond its normal extension. This causes the soft tissue fibers of the fascia to tear or stretch at points along its length, leading to inflammation, pain and possibly the growth of a bone spur where it attaches to the heel bone.
 
Inflammation may become irritated by shoes that lack appropriate support, mainly in the arch area and by the constant irritation associated with an athletic lifestyle. Resting may provide temporary relief, but when you resume walking you may experience a sudden elongation of the fascia band, which stretches and pulls on the heel. As you walk the pain may lessen or even disappear, but that may just be a false sense of relief, as the pain will often return after prolonged rest or extensive walking.  
 
You can take steps now to avoid heel pain, including:
  • Wear shoes that fit well
  • Wear proper shoes for each activity
  • Do not wear shoes with excessive wear on heels or soles
  • Prepare properly before exercising by stretching and warming up
  • Pace yourself when you participate in athletic activities
  • Don’t underestimate your body’s need for rest and good nutrition
  • Lose excess weight
If pain and other symptoms of inflammation persist, you should limit your normal daily activities and contact your podiatrist immediately.  
By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
June 27, 2018
Category: Sports injuries

Like all sports, lacrosse has its dangers. Anytime there are multiple people running on a field to make a goal and to beat out another team, the ante is upped and injuries begin. Although lacrosse is a little less high-impact than football, it still has its fair share of injuries to boast about. Read more on the most common lacrosse injuries and how they should be treated.

Common lacrosse Injuries:

  • Ankle Sprains – Inversion ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries that lacrosse players experience. This is because as they run up and down the field, make sharp turns and sudden adjustments, their ankles are not always prepared for the drastic change. When this happens, their ankles often roll and become sprained during the process. Ankle sprains can be very painful and have symptoms that can include swelling, redness, bruising and inflammation. If you sprain your ankle in a game or practice, it is important to take a seat off the field and prepare an appointment to see a podiatrist for treatment.
  • Ankle Fractures – in more severe instances, the ankle can roll, be subjected to a large amount of pressure and can fracture. Also, constant running and repetitive pressure from the sport can cause stress fractures. Fractures often are painful, cause swelling, bruising and inflammation. It can also render an athlete immobile and they may need assistance getting off the field. Ankle fractures should be seen by a podiatrist immediately for proper treatment and placement for healing.
  • Plantar Fasciitis – this condition affects the arch of the foot. It usually strikes first thing in the morning and includes intense pain. As the day progresses, it relaxes and the pain ebbs. When a person sits for a long period of time and then tries to stand, it often can become very painful again because the muscles tighten and contract. Plantar fasciitis is attributed to overuse, especially in sports.

If you play lacrosse and suffer from any of the above-mentioned ailments, be sure to see a podiatrist right away. A podiatrist is trained to get your feet healthy as fast as possible so that you can get back into the game. Call Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC located in Chandler, Arizona. The number is 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today. Lacrosse injuries can be dealt with, let us help.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
May 09, 2018

When you get the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis, it can sometimes be a head-scratcher. How is it that you inflicted all of this pain on your foot? It seemed perfectly fine a week ago, so how did things transpire so quickly? Plantar fasciitis can sneak up on anyone at any given moment. All it takes is a little overuse, an activity your feet aren’t used to or a traumatic injury to trigger the condition and its accompanied pain. Want the specifics? Here are some reasons why you could be plagued with plantar fasciitis.

  1. You gained some weight. Gaining a little weight can be harmless, but if you aren’t careful it can have dramatic effects on your health. Extra weight causes extra strain and shock to the feet which can cause the inflammation of the plantar fascia and trigger plantar fasciitis.
  2. Your feet aren’t shaped “normally.” What this means in the world of podiatry is that you either have a flat foot or high arched feet instead of a “typical” arch. Flat footed individuals typically experience more stress on their middle under-foot and need shoes with more cushion to prevent this condition. High-arched individuals need shoes with more shock support.
  3. You just took part in a Cotton-Eyed Joe marathon and you haven’t Cotton- Eye Joe’d since high school. When you partake in a rapid increase of activity, your feet will suffer. They are under an abnormal amount of strain and have no time to ease into the transition. As such, they often end up suffering from plantar fasciitis.
  4. You are wearing the wrong shoes. Shoes such as heels or flip flops do not have any support or shock absorption. This can cause havoc to your plantar fascia and it can endure a lot of strain because of it. Strain causes inflammation and a trip to the podiatrist’s office.
  5. Sports injuries can also cause plantar fasciitis. If you suffer a foot trauma such as a break or fracture coupled with blunt force trauma, you can easily suffer from plantar fasciitis paired with that injury. If you are hurt during sports, do not try to walk it off, see a podiatrist immediately.

Plantar fasciitis can be bothersome, but it is treatable by a podiatrist. Call  Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC located in Chandler, Arizona. Call 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today. There are treatments available to help you live pain-free.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
February 08, 2018
Category: Exercise injury

In a physically challenging sport such as aerobics, injuries are common, and often involve the foot, ankle, and lower leg. Podiatrists say that most injuries from aerobics result from improper shoes, surfaces, or routines, and overuse of muscles through too vigorous a regimen. This can be detrimental to the foot, ankle, and legs as they need a lot of protection when they are constantly in use. If the feet and ankles are not protected, they can suffer from disorders such as bunions, heel spurs, plantar fasciitis, shin splints and more.

If you are attending an aerobics class, make sure it is led by a certified instructor. Hardwood floors, especially with padded mats, are the best surfaces possible for the feet and body during the high impact of the activity. If you can, start with a multi-impact class where you can start at a low-impact level and work your way up as your conditioning improves. This will allow your feet and ankles to get used to the vigorous activity and build up a tolerance. Be sure to give the feet and ankles breaks in between classes so that they can rest and heal.

Exercising at home with a video can be cost-efficient, but it is still important to be very careful. Read the label to determine whether the video is produced by certified aerobics instructors and whether you can handle the degree of impact. While it's safe to do low-to-moderate impact aerobics on the living room carpet, that's not a proper surface for high-impact routines. At-home aerobics can cause an array of foot and ankle problems if you have not done it before.

Any time you partake in aerobics, be sure to include a proper warm-up period. Make sure there are no rapid, violent movements. Knees should always be loose during warm-up. A static stretch held for 10 seconds can help avoid overstretching injuries as well.

Drink adequate water to avoid dehydration during workouts. Dehydration can cause nausea, dizziness, muscle fatigue, and cramping. For exercise lasting longer than 45 minutes, a sports nutrition drink may be superior to water.

Don't underestimate the importance of the cool-off period. It burns off lactic acid (which makes muscles feel tired) and adrenaline while keeping blood from pooling in the extremities.

Be sure to start slow. Unless you have been doing aerobics all of your life, it is not likely that you will be able to keep the pace of a professional who does it every day, multiple times a day. Be sure to invest in the proper equipment and footwear prior to the start of your regimen to prevent injury. If you do injure yourself while partaking in the activity, see a podiatrist right away. Immediate treatment of foot and ankle problems can prevent severe problems down the road. Call Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC located in Chandler, Arizona. Call 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today. Don’t let the fear of an aerobic injury prevent you from enjoying it.