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Posts for tag: Healthy Feet

Y:\Clearwater Marketing\Webpower Video\Webpower Stock Photos\plantar-fasciitis5.jpgFlip flops are easy to take on and off, however they are dangerous for your feet. Everyday flip flop use can cause plantar fasciitis. Stress fractures, tendinitis, and shin splints are also problems that stem from wearing flip flops too often. Flip flops that are too small for your feet might give you blisters and other infections. However, flip flops that are too big will cause you to slip and fall while you walk. Experts believe that well-fitting sneakers are the best option for your feet.

Wearing flip-flops for a long period of time can be harmful for the feet. To learn more, consult with Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will provide you with the foot- and ankle information you seek.

Flip-Flops and Feet

When the weather starts warming up, people enjoy wearing flip-flops.  Flip-flops are comfortable, stylish, and easy to slip on and off, perfect for any summer beach goer.  However, these shoes can cause harm to the feet.

How Can Flip-Flops Affect Me Long-Term?

  • Ankle problems
  • Hip problems
  • Lower back problems
  • Pain in the balls of the feet
  • Problems with foot arches
  • Changes in the way you walk

Are there injuries associated with flip-flops?

Yes.  Since flip-flops are relatively weak and do not provide the same amount of support as sneakers, people who wear flip-flops are more susceptible to injuries. On top of that, the open nature of the shoe makes your feet more prone to other problems, such as cuts and even infections.  Common injuries and ailments include:

  • Sprained ankles
  • Blisters
  • Infections
  • Cuts and Scrapes

If you have any questions, please contact one of our offices located in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Flip-Flops and Your Feet

Contrary to popular belief, Athlete’s foot equally affects both men and women, which opposes the long heralded idea that the condition mostly affects men. According to the dermatology department at South Korea’s Kyung Hee University Medical Center, of 676 patients treated for Athlete’s foot, 53.1% were male and 46.9% were female. People who wear shoes that don’t allow proper air circulation are especially prone to to developing the condition.

For more information about how to treat and prevent Athlete’s foot, consult with Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speaking to your podiatrist will give you a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as helping you figure out which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Athlete’s Foot

Keeping your feet healthy is as simple as taking good care of them. Treat any cracked heels, dry skin, or chipping toenails with some DIY methods. Soak your feet in a warm foot bath for up to 10 minutes. Use a natural foot scrub, such as a pumice or an exfoliant, to rub away any dead skin. You can also use the pumice stone or a file to smooth away any hard skin around your heels or the balls of your feet. After drying your feet, moisturize and make a habit of trimming your toenails. Refrain from cutting them too short or cutting them in a round shape to prevent ingrown toenails.

Regardless of season or weather, everyday foot care should be practiced year round. For more information about everyday foot care, consult with Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discontwill attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

Everyday Foot Care

Often, people take care of their bodies, face and hair more so than they do for their feet. But the feet are a very important aspect of our bodies, and one that we should pay more attention to. After all, without our feet, we would not be able to perform most daily tasks. It is best to check your feet regularly to make sure there are no new bruises or cuts that you may not have noticed before, for example.

For dry feet, moisturizer can easily be a remedy and can be applied as often as necessary to the affected areas. Wearing shoes that fit well can also help you maintain good foot health, as well as making it easier to walk and do daily activities without the stress or pain of ill-fitting shoes, high heels, or even flip flops.

Also, wearing clean socks with closed shoes is important to ensure that sweat and bacteria do not accumulate within the shoe. Clean socks help to prevent athlete’s foot, fungi problems, bad odors, and can absorb sweat.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Everyday Foot Care

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
December 15, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Toenail Fungus   Healthy Feet   Toenail   Fungus  

Ingrown Toenails Toenail fungus affects nearly 20 percent of the population and is one of the most common foot conditions that is treated by your podiatrist. Characterized by thick, disfigured, yellow nails, this recurring disorder can cause the nail to grow fragile, brittle, loose, and, in some cases, to crumble away. In the most severe cases, infected nails may even cause pain or difficulty walking. 

Fungi thrive in warm, moist environments and can spread from person to person. Like athlete’s foot, you can contract a fungal nail infection from simply walking barefoot in public showers or pools, or by sharing nail clippers or shoes. Fungal infections can also infect fingernails, but toenails are more difficult to treat as toenails typically grow more slowly. By following simple preventive measures from your podiatrist, you can take the next step to healthy, attractive feet. 

How to Prevent Pesky Toenail Fungus 

Toenail fungus is common, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be easily prevented. By following these simple guidelines from your podiatrist, you can take the next step toward healthy feet:   

  • Wear shower shoes at public pools and locker rooms.
  • Never share nail clippers or files.
  • Wear dry shoes that allow air to circulate around your feet.
  • Avoid injury to your nail, such as cutting it too short.
  • Inspect your feet and toes regularly.
  • Trim your toenails straight across to avoid ingrown toenail infections.
  • Wear open-toed shoes if weather permits.
  • Avoid wearing nail polish and disinfect pedicure tools.
  • Wear clean, dry cotton socks that provide breathing room and whisk away moisture.

And if you are unable to avoid the development of toenail fungus, a trip to your podiatrist will do the trick. Your podiatrist will work with you to determine the best treatment plan for eliminating your toenail fungus, while also offering helpful advice for ways to prevent the development of this pesky infection.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
August 14, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Diabetes   Foot Hygiene   Healthy Feet  
Diabetes causes a condition of painful nerve damage called peripheral neuropathy. Neuropathy can affect your entire body, but the legs and feet are the body’s most prone areas to serious Diabeteshealth problems. Damage to the nerves can cause the loss of feeling in your feet, making it difficult to detect extreme temperatures and pain as easily or readily as someone who does not have diabetes. Understanding the connection between foot care and diabetes is important to avoid more serious health problems. Visit your podiatrist, about the best ways to care for your feet. 


Inspect Your Feet Regularly


If you have diabetes, it’s crucial to examine your feet every day and after every injury, regardless of how minor you may think the injury is. If you notice redness, swelling, persistent pain, numbness, tingling or any other unusual signs on any part of your foot, call your podiatrist immediately, as this could signify serious health problems. 
 
It’s also recommended that people with diabetes see a podiatrist for annual checkups. A professional podiatrist can detect broken skin or ulcers that can be detrimental to the health of your feet and body. They can also check your blood circulation, identify loss of sensation or detect areas of high pressure - all of which require professional medical attention. 


Small Foot Problems Can Lead to Bigger Problems


|If you have diabetes, even the smallest foot problems can turn into more serious complications. Some of these small complications include:
  • Ulcers that don’t heal
  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Cracked heels
  • Hammertoes
  • Bunions
  • Ingrown toenails
With these complications, you run the risk of developing diabetic peripheral neuropathy, which is a condition that develops slowly and worsens over time, and Charcot foot, which is a condition in which the bones of the foot are weakened enough to fracture. Taking extra precautions and caring for even the smallest injuries with care might just save your foot. 


Keep Your Feet Healthy with Proper Foot Hygiene


Everyone needs to practice good foot hygiene daily, but people with diabetes should pay extra attention to keeping their feet clean in order to prevent health problems. If you have diabetes, your podiatrist urges you to:
  • Wash your feet daily with lukewarm water and mild soap, making sure to dry them thoroughly, especially between the toes. 
  • Keep the skin on your feet smooth and soft by applying a non-irritating moisturizer, avoiding the areas between the toes. Doing so can help prevent cracks and sores that lead to infection. 
  • Avoid ingrown toenails than can get infected by keeping them neatly trimmed straight across.
  • Wear clean, dry socks and change them every day.
  • Avoid walking barefoot to protect feet from harmful foreign particles. 
  • Never attempt to remove corns, calluses or other sores from your feet on your own. See your podiatrist for safe and pain-free removal. 
Early detection, simple care, and regular inspections can go a long way to avoid serious foot complications related to diabetes. Diabetes is serious, especially when it comes to your feet. If you have diabetes, talk with your podiatrist about what you can do now to keep your feet safe, strong, and healthy.