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Posts for tag: Foot Hygiene

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
April 04, 2016
Category: Foot Care

Most people don’t worry about their feet when it comes to hygiene, but cleaning your feet should be part of your daily routine. Our feet are vital to our everyday lives,Foot Health and Hygiene which is why we need to care for them and pay attention to any problems that may arise. To stay on top of your foot health, practicing good foot hygiene is the best place to start.

Daily Foot Care

  • Wash and dry your feet every day. Use a mild soap. Wash between your toes and be sure to dry your feet and toes thoroughly.
  • Wear appropriately fitting socks and shoes. We recommend shoes with a non-slip outsole as well as any inserts or orthotics that have been prescribed. Wearing padded socks can also help protect against injuries to the skin tissue of your foot.
  • As well as wearing padded socks, keeping those socks clean is also important. Change your socks daily or more frequently if you are active and your feet have perspired.
  • Don’t wear the same pair of shoes twice - instead, rotate their use. Giving your shoes time to dry out is important, especially if you are active and perspire heavily.
  • Keep your shoes clean, inside and out.
  • It’s best to avoid going barefoot, especially in public areas. If you must go barefoot, be sure to wash your feel carefully afterwards and to thoroughly dry them.

Toenail Care

  • When trimming your toenails regularly (every two weeks), cut them straight across with clean nail clippers or scissors. Sanitize your nail tool periodically by soaking them in alcohol.
  • If you cannot reach your toenails to cut them, do not attempt it. See a professional for help.
  • If your toenails become discolored, it could be a sign of an underlying health problem. You should seek proper medical attention from a podiatrist. Healthy toenails are a pale pink where they are attached to the skin. The rest of the nail should be clear where it is not adhered to the skin.

Inspecting Your Feet Daily

Examining your feet is very important. Check your feet once a day. Look at the tops and bottoms of your feet, in between your toes and your toenails. Be sure to check for blisters, bumps, lumps, bruises, cuts, sores, cracked skin and any temperature differences. Pain tingling and numbness of the foot can signal nerve problems. Also, loss of hair on the foot of leg can indicate circulation problems. If you see or feel anything different about your feet, don’t hesitate! Contact your podiatrist for help and to have the problem properly diagnosed.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
August 14, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Diabetes   Foot Hygiene   Healthy Feet  
Diabetes causes a condition of painful nerve damage called peripheral neuropathy. Neuropathy can affect your entire body, but the legs and feet are the body’s most prone areas to serious Diabeteshealth problems. Damage to the nerves can cause the loss of feeling in your feet, making it difficult to detect extreme temperatures and pain as easily or readily as someone who does not have diabetes. Understanding the connection between foot care and diabetes is important to avoid more serious health problems. Visit your podiatrist, about the best ways to care for your feet. 


Inspect Your Feet Regularly


If you have diabetes, it’s crucial to examine your feet every day and after every injury, regardless of how minor you may think the injury is. If you notice redness, swelling, persistent pain, numbness, tingling or any other unusual signs on any part of your foot, call your podiatrist immediately, as this could signify serious health problems. 
 
It’s also recommended that people with diabetes see a podiatrist for annual checkups. A professional podiatrist can detect broken skin or ulcers that can be detrimental to the health of your feet and body. They can also check your blood circulation, identify loss of sensation or detect areas of high pressure - all of which require professional medical attention. 


Small Foot Problems Can Lead to Bigger Problems


|If you have diabetes, even the smallest foot problems can turn into more serious complications. Some of these small complications include:
  • Ulcers that don’t heal
  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Cracked heels
  • Hammertoes
  • Bunions
  • Ingrown toenails
With these complications, you run the risk of developing diabetic peripheral neuropathy, which is a condition that develops slowly and worsens over time, and Charcot foot, which is a condition in which the bones of the foot are weakened enough to fracture. Taking extra precautions and caring for even the smallest injuries with care might just save your foot. 


Keep Your Feet Healthy with Proper Foot Hygiene


Everyone needs to practice good foot hygiene daily, but people with diabetes should pay extra attention to keeping their feet clean in order to prevent health problems. If you have diabetes, your podiatrist urges you to:
  • Wash your feet daily with lukewarm water and mild soap, making sure to dry them thoroughly, especially between the toes. 
  • Keep the skin on your feet smooth and soft by applying a non-irritating moisturizer, avoiding the areas between the toes. Doing so can help prevent cracks and sores that lead to infection. 
  • Avoid ingrown toenails than can get infected by keeping them neatly trimmed straight across.
  • Wear clean, dry socks and change them every day.
  • Avoid walking barefoot to protect feet from harmful foreign particles. 
  • Never attempt to remove corns, calluses or other sores from your feet on your own. See your podiatrist for safe and pain-free removal. 
Early detection, simple care, and regular inspections can go a long way to avoid serious foot complications related to diabetes. Diabetes is serious, especially when it comes to your feet. If you have diabetes, talk with your podiatrist about what you can do now to keep your feet safe, strong, and healthy.