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Posts for tag: Chilblains

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
April 03, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Chilblains  

If you’ve recently exposed extremities to the harsh cold elements then you may be dealing with itching, swelling skin on the fingers and toes. This itchyChilblains manifestation is known as chilblains, and it’s a common bodily response to cold (particularly in regions that experience colder, damper weather).

Chilblains often show up in just a few hours after being exposed to the cold. Skin may even start to turn red or blue. The skin usually burns or itches. You may find that the minute you walk into the warmth or heat that these sensations get worse. If you have a really bad case of chilblains then the skin may even crack open or blister.

While scratching the skin may feel good at the moment it’s really important that you do not scratch the skin, as the skin is more susceptible to cracking or breaking open and becoming infected. There are some people who are more at risk for developing chilblains such as:

  • Heredity
  • Living in areas with cold weather
  • Being underweight
  • Having poor circulation
  • Certain immune conditions (e.g. lupus)
  • Smoking

While this condition may sound rather concerning or serious, most people won’t actually need to visit a podiatry or specialist for their chilblains. In most cases, this condition will clear up within a few weeks and shouldn’t cause any complications. However, there are some situations that may warrant visiting a podiatrist. If your symptoms don’t go away within a few weeks, or if the itching and swelling are severe, then it’s time to seek medical attention as soon as possible. Medication may be necessary to improve circulation in your feet.

It’s also important to be aware of symptoms of an infection such as a high fever, malaise, swollen lymph nodes and pus in the affected toes. If you notice any of these symptoms call your foot doctor right away.

Otherwise, you can typically manage your symptoms on your own from the comfort of your own home. Look for lotions and creams that may relieve itching (if you aren’t sure, ask your podiatrist for recommendations). You can also prevent or reduce your chances of developing chilblains by avoiding the cold as much as possible, providing your feet with ample protection or taking measures to improve poor circulation.

While it might seem tempting to immediately place feet into hot water or near a fireplace after being in the cold, such extreme temperature changes are what can cause this problem to occur. Warming the areas up gradually is always your safest bet. If in doubt, talk to your podiatrist about ways to protect yourself.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
July 26, 2017
Category: Foot Conditions

It is normal to have chilly feet. Typically, we warm them up or completely ignore the feeling. Our day to day lives continue on and we are none the wiser. Sometimes though, that is not the case. When you examine your feet and they are cold, achy, red and swelling it could be a sign of a more serious problem. Chilblains, also known as Perino, chill burns, and perniosis could be ailing your cold feet. This condition occurs when an individual is exposed to cold and humidity and can cause serious tissue damage.

Chilblains is often confused with Frostbite and Trench Foot. Although it’s symptoms can be similar, an entire different attack is occurring on the feet.

Symptoms

  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Itching
  • Inflammation
  • Blisters – due to damage in the capillary bed in the skin
  • Dermatitis
  • Ulceration
  • Pain

Although quite uncomfortable, Chilblains can be controlled. It is important to keep your feet warm when facing this condition. Having warm feet reduces the risk of permanent damage to the foot. After taking a dip at the beach, feet that have been in a pool, and of course the harsh cold of winter can cause flair ups.

Chilblains can be a condition that stands completely on its own and does not have relation to another underlying illness or it can have a connection to a more severe illness. It is important to see a podiatrist such as Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn at Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC conveniently located in Chandler, Arizona. There they can determine whether your Chilblains is related to another underlying cause or not.

Treatment

It is important to keep your feet warm at all times if you have Chilblains. Warm shoes and socks are key. Merino wool is both warm and breathable and a good choice for patients suffering with this disorder. Tight fitted shoes are not recommended due to the lack of air and circulation that they can cause the foot. Sticking pieces of wool and cotton between your toes, inside your shoes, can help keep feet warm and improve circulation. While at home, soak your feet in warm water with Epsom salts for 15-20 minute intervals, but be sure not to use very hot water. This will help with circulation which will keep the feet warm.

Think you are suffering from Chilblains? Are your feet red, burning, swollen and itchy? Call our office today at 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today. We want to get your feet into tip top shape.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
June 06, 2017
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Walking   neuroma   Ischemic foot   Chilblains   exercising  

Nerve or vascular problems have two things in common, blood flow and circulation. The treatment for most of these are simple and can be done with some home care and a quick trip to the podiatrist. If left unattended however, this could cause more serious conditions, especially in diabetics. Walking, exercising, keeping your feet warm, wearing shoes that give your feet room to wiggle are all good affordable ways to keep your feet clear of vascular difficulty.

Types of Vascular Conditions:

  • Neuroma is an enlarged benign growth of nerves that are caused by the foot’s tissue rubbing against the nerves. It causes a sensation of numbness, tingling, burning or pain in the ball of your foot.
  • Chilblains (cold feet) is affiliated with the skin and how it reacts poorly to the cold. Circulation can be an issue and you may develop redness, swelling and itchy skin.
  • Acrocyanosis is a disorder that is painless but it effects the blood supply from the arteries to the skin. It usually doesn’t turn into a more serious condition but can be a sign of other issues. Your feet may be constantly cold, sweaty, swollen or discolored.
  • Ischemic Foot causes a decrease in blood flow from the heart to the feet. You may experience muscle cramping, discoloration, cold feet and eventually ulcers.

Fixing Neuroma:

  • Non-prescription anti-inflammatory medications to reduce pain and swelling.
  • Massaging the painful region three times daily with ice.
  • Change footwear regularly.
  • Arch supports and foot pads to help reduce pressure on the nerve.

These neurological conditions can occur in one foot or both feet and can affect the nerve between the third and fourth toes, but sometimes the second and third toes are affected.as well. Neuroma can occur at any age, but most often affects middle-aged women.

A Morton's neuroma will not disappear on its own. Usually, the symptoms will fluctuate depending on the type of shoes you wear and how much time you spend on your feet. Sometimes, the symptoms will go away completely but it is best to contact a podiatrist as soon as symptoms begin to treat it appropriately. Let our specialist, Dr. Discont, give you a hand with your feet and call Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC in our Chandler office at 480-732-0033 to schedule an appointment

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
March 15, 2017
Category: Foot Care

These medical labels and names can sometimes be scary when we hear them from a doctor or read them on line as we try to self-diagnose. Alan J. Discont, DPM and Dr. Krahn  at Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC specialize in nerve problems associated with your feet and can give you a clear understanding of your condition without making it sound tragic. Let’s take a closer look and dissect some of them to form better understanding for us layman.

  • Neuroma ~ an enlarged benign growth of nerves that are caused by the foot’s tissue rubbing against the nerves. You may feel a sensation of numbness, tingling, burning or pain in the ball of your foot.
  • Ischemic Foot ~ causes a decrease in blood flow from the heart to the feet. You may experience muscle cramping, discoloration, cold feet and eventually ulcers.
  • Chilblains (cold feet) ~ this must be the reason we lose our nerve at times with cold feet? Well, not this time. This kind is affiliated with the skin and how it reacts poorly to the cold. Circulation can be an issue and you may develop redness, swelling and itchy skin.
  • Acrocyanosis ~ this disorder is painless but effects the blood supply from the arteries to the skin. It usually doesn’t turn into a more serious condition but can be a sign of having another condition in the body. Your feet may be constantly cold, sweaty, swollen or discolored.

Nerve or vascular problems, such as mentioned above, have two things in common, blood flow and circulation. The treatment for most of these are simple and can be done with some home care and a quick trip to the podiatrist. If left unattended however, this could cause more serious conditions, especially in diabetics. Walking, exercising, keeping your feet warm, wearing shoes that give your feet room to wiggle are all good affordable ways to keep your feet clear of vascular difficulty, which sounds more difficult than it really is.

Educating yourself is wonderful but make sure that your doctor gets involved before you have convinced yourself that you have all the above conditions! If you need a diagnosis contact us in Chandler Arizona at 480-732-0033. Don’t let your cold feet make you avoid the doctor!