My Blog

Posts for tag: Calcaneal Wounds

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
June 15, 2016
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Calcaneal Wounds  

Calcaneal WoundPatients often come to foot doctors with concerns about sores, wounds and lesions on the feet. One type of foot problem that is very urgent for podiatrists and their patients alike is a calcaneal wound. Without critical and proper treatment, these types of lesions could become very serious and even lead to the amputation of foot tissue. Learn more about calcaneal wounds, what causes them and how they can be treated successfully by your podiatrist.

What Is a Calcaneal Wound?

A calcaneal wound is a problem that occurs around the heel. The word “calcaneus” is a more formal word for the heel bone. The wound progressively gets worse, starting as a small sore, progressing to an ulcer and then (if not properly treated in early stages) it can become an infected series of lesions and ulcers that requires tissue to be removed. In extreme cases, amputation may be necessary.

How Does this Type of Wound Develop?

Calcaneal wounds usually develop as a result of direct injury to the heel of the foot, obesity (continual pressure on the same area of the foot causes the ulcer to form) or diabetic complications. If a patient experiences a severe trauma to the heel of the foot that causes a wound, but doesn’t get it treated it can progress to an infection. Patients who are overweight often develop pressure ulcer on their heels. And diabetic patients who experience neuropathy (nerve damage) due to out­of­control blood glucose levels are also susceptible to calcaneal wounds.

Calcaneal Wound Treatments

It’s important to see a podiatrist at the first signs of a calcaneal wound. The usual treatment plan includes cleaning the wound thoroughly, removing bad tissue, applying wound care medication, bandaging the area and prescribing antibiotics to fight infection. In serious cases surgical treatment may be necessary correct the problem.

If you are at risk of developing calcaneal wounds, sores or ulcers in any part of your foot, keep a direct line open with your podiatrist. Schedule regular checkups with your foot doctor to continually monitor the condition of your feet. It’s also important that you follow doctor’s orders from your primary care provider.