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Posts for tag: Bunion

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
October 16, 2018
Category: foot deformities
Tags: Orthotics   Bunion   supportive shoes  

Have you ever wondered why some people have big toes that point inward towards their other toes, or have a big, red, bulbous appearance at the base of their big toe? Chances are you were looking at a pretty advanced cased of bunions! You can tell a bunion is very far along in its development when the base of the big toe bone looks red, inflamed, and is abnormally large. This is the product of a bone deformity called a bunion. The area where your big toe bone meets the other parts of your foot bones forms a bony growth that pushes the big toe inward. The deformity leading to a bunion is typically caused by the toe bone being forced to grow in an abnormal direction.

This can be due to shoes with poor support, shoes that are too small for your feet, and can sometimes even happen simply because of your genetic makeup! Of all the things to inherit, a bunion isn’t the most enjoyable. Bunions can range from barely noticeable to being a very uncomfortable and even painful experience. Here are some tips and tricks from all of us at Family Foot & Ankle Care to help you avoid developing bunions:

Ask your family - it never hurts to simply ask your family what their experience has been with bunions. Did they ever get it treated? When did it start developing?

Get fitted shoes - this is by far one of the most important tips! You can potentially avoid bunions altogether by simply finding supportive shoes that truly fit your feet. Don’t settle for flimsy alternatives!

Talk to your foot doctor about orthotics - even if you don't have bunions, orthotics are a great way to help avoid developing them. Orthotics may even help with any other foot issues you have!

If you already have bunions, some of these tips may still help you. Wearing tight shoes will only make your bunion worse and cause you pain! If you notice an increase in pain or discomfort that doesn't go away, be sure to call Dr. Alan J. Discont, Dr. Gregory M. Krahn, and Dr. Boyd Andrews at 408-732-0033. Schedule an appointment today at our location in Chandler, Arizona.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
July 25, 2018
Category: Foot surgery
Tags: Swelling   Bunion   pain   bones   surgeries  

In many cases, a bunion can be a mild inconvenience, but some bunions begin to grow out of control and cause a lot of pain and suffering in the foot. When a bunion causes so much pain and suffering in the foot that a person can not function regularly, then it is time to consider foot surgery.

What Is a Bunion?

A bunion develops when excess bone growth occurs outside of the joint of your big toe. In many cases, this causes your big toe to turn inward toward your other toes and creates a bump on the side of the big toe. Other symptoms a bunion can produce are inflammation, swelling, pain and problems moving around. Bunions develop in many cases due to improperly fitting shoes that place pressure on the toe and move it out of place, or because of poor genetics.

In many cases, bunions can be treated without surgery by changing footwear and using orthotics. If the bunion is too severe surgery may be the best option.

Types of Surgeries

Osteotomy is a procedure where the foot surgeon makes small cuts into the bones. The surgeon does this to make space so that he or she can realign the foot properly.  He or she may use pins to hold the bones in the corrected position while you heal. These pins can be removed later on at the recommendation of the foot surgeon.

Exostectomy is a procedure where the foot surgeon extracts the extra bone that makes up the bunion on the joint of the toe. Exostectomy is often used in conjunction with an osteotomy to correct the alignment of the toe.

Traditional surgeries call for large incisions that open up the entire foot for the foot doctor to view. With new modern technologies, there are many minimally invasive options available that only require small incisions to be made in the foot. In most cases, a foot surgeon or podiatrist will recommend a surgery that is minimally invasive as it also has a shorter recuperation window and patients tend to heal better with these types of surgeries.

If you have a bunion that is out of control, call Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC located in Chandler, Arizona. The number is 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today. 

By Family Foot and Ankle Care, PC
August 15, 2016
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Bunion   Hallux Valgus  

Hallux ValgusHallux valgus may sound like a complicated, rare disease or a spell from the Harry Potter universe, but it's actually another name for bunions, a common foot disorder.

If your podiatrist has diagnosed you with hallux valgus, you may be a little taken aback. Don't worry,­ that's just a long name for a common foot disorder­ also known as a bunion. The hallux is better known as your big toe, and "valgus" means bent or twisted. These two words together describe exactly what a bunion is­ your big toe bent toward your other toes. Moving on to your next possible concerns: why does this problem exist and how can it be treated or prevented?

Hallux Valgus 101

Bunions form due to pressure on the two joints of the big toe. This toe becomes angled unnaturally inward and the bunion is the resulting deformity of the bone. Contrary to popular belief, they are not tumors or cysts. Bunions can present with pain, swelling, and increasingly limited range of motion.

Causes

Experts are divided on the cause of bunions: some believe that they are genetic, while others place the blame on years of wearing shoes that crowd the toes. In either case, shoes are thought to worsen hallux valgus deformities over time if they put pressure on the toes or contort the feet into abnormal positions. Since women's footwear is generally more narrow and confining than men's, bunions occur more often in them. While arthritis does not necessarily cause bunions, the joint inflammation can worsen them.

Treatment

Your podiatrist will likely recommend non­surgical options first. You should ensure that your shoes are comfortable and fit properly. Specialty shoe store employees can take measurements of your foot and recommend the best size. Shoe inserts or arch supports can be used to redistribute your weight and relax the muscles. For pain, over­the­counter analgesics like ibuprofen or naproxen are recommended.

If you continue you to have problems, surgery to remove some of the bone or surrounding tissue to straighten the foot back into position. A change in the shape of your foot or the way your shoes fit warrants a call to your podiatrist for evaluation.

Many common foot conditions, such as bunions, can be cured with a variety of different treatments that do not involve surgery. When Floria Antell found a bunion on her left foot two years ago, her podiatrist suggested an invasive surgical procedure that would require rest afterwards for eight weeks. Antell instead looked to another podiatrist who prescribed her custom foot insoles that relieved pressure on her bunion and corrected her flat feet. This, combined with anti-inflammatory medication and shockwave therapy, allowed for her bunion to fully heal after six months—even with her daily walks and exercise. Antell shares, “It was so important to me that I didn’t have to be in bed for months, but I also learned how to take care of my feet better.” 

To avoid extended pain, consider bunion treatment as soon as possible. For more information about bunion treatments, consult with Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What is a Bunion?

A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs by the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

Why do Bunions Form?

  • Genetics – susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary
  • Stress on the feet – poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can cause bunions to form

How are Bunions Diagnosed?

Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

How are Bunions Treated?

  • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
  • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
  • Orthotics or foot inserts
  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions