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Posts for tag: Broken Bone

By Family Foot & Ankle Care PC
January 18, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Broken Bone   Sprain   Fractured Foot  
Did I Break My FootWhether you took a bad tumble or your child had a rough collision while playing sports, it’s important that you do not just recognize the signs of a broken foot but that you also seek immediate medical attention. Of course, we know that it isn’t always easy to differentiate a break from a sprain. Here are some signs that your foot is broken and need to be seen by a qualified podiatrist,
  • Pain that occurs immediately after an injury or accident
  • Pain that is directly above a bone
  • Pain that is worse with movement
  • Bruising and severe swelling
  • A cracking sound at the moment of injury
  • A visible deformity or bump
  • Can’t put weight on the injured foot
If you or your child is experiencing symptoms of a fractured foot or ankle they must turn to a podiatrist for care. We can diagnose, set, and treat all types of fractures; however, if the bone is dislocated or looks severely broken (a visible bump or deformity appears on the foot) it’s a good idea to head to your local ER.
 
How can I tell the difference between a break and a sprain?

The symptoms of a sprain are far less severe. You can often put weight on the injured foot with a sprain; however, you may notice some slight pain and stiffness. You may also have heard a popping sound at the moment of the injury with a sprain, while a broken bone often produces a cracking sound. The pain associated with a sprain will also be above soft tissue rather than bone. A podiatrist will perform an X-ray to be able to determine if you are dealing with a break or a sprain.
 
How is a broken bone in the foot treated?

Rest is key to allowing an injury, particularly a fracture, to heal properly. Along with rest, your doctor may also recommend either an over-the-counter or prescription-strength pain reliever, depending on the severity of your fracture. Those with more moderate to severe fractures may require a special boot, brace, or splint. Those with more severe fractures may need to wear a cast and use crutches, so they can avoid putting any weight on the foot.
 
If you are on the fence about whether or not to see a podiatrist about your injury, why not simply give us a call? We can discuss your symptoms on the phone to determine whether we can take a wait-and-see approach or whether you need to come in right away for care.
By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
April 26, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Broken Bone   Foot Cast  

Learn how to properly care for your foot cast to promote faster healing.

If you’ve broken a bone in your foot, then chances are pretty good that your podiatrist has told you that you have to wear a cast to protect and support it until the break heals.

However, there are certain things you need to do to properly care for your foot cast, so it can be most effective in helping your injury heal. It’s important to understand the basic elements that go into caring for your cast, so you are back to your old self in no time.

Handling Foot Swelling

Sometimes your foot may swell while it’s in the case, making the cast feel uncomfortable and restrictive. Here are some ways to reduce your foot swelling, so you cast doesn’t feel so unpleasant:

  • Elevate your foot above your heart for the first three days after your cast has been put on. If you can, also try to sleep with your foot propped up on a pillow.
  • Wiggle and move your toes around to keep blood flow circulating throughout your injured foot.
  • You can also apply an ice pack, covered with a towel, around your cast for the first two to three days after getting your cast. Ice the cast for about 20 minutes every couple of hours throughout the day.

Handling an Itchy Cast

Sometimes the skin underneath the cast can get a bit itchy, which is enough to drive anyone a little mad. Here are some ways to relieve that itch without damaging your cast:

  • Turn your hair dryer on cool and target under your cast to reach the itchy spots
  • Apply a towel­wrapped ice pack to the cast where the itchy area is
  • Consider taking an over­the­counter antihistamine to help relieve itching

Whatever you do, do not try to place utensils or objects under your cast to scratch your skin, as this could cause an open wound and potential infection.

Keeping Your Cast Dry

Most of the time, your podiatrist will recommend that you avoid getting your cast wet. If your cast is made from plaster then you will need to keep it dry at all times. Apply a plastic bag or waterproof wrapping over your cast when bathing or showering.

If you have a fiberglass cast, however, it’s typically okay if it does get wet. This is because the cast is usually lined with a water­repellent layer; however, find out from your podiatrist whether or not your fiberglass cast can be wet. Anytime your fiberglass cast gets wet, just let it air dry.

If you have any questions about your foot cast, call your podiatrist today!