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Posts for tag: Athlete's Foot

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
January 15, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Athlete's Foot  

Athletes FootAthlete's foot is one of the most common fungal infections of the skin and is frequently seen in our office. Whether you've had it or not, it's important to understand how you can avoid and treat this highly contagious infection if you do contract it.

The fungus that causes athlete's foot thrives in damp, moist environments and often grows in warm, humid climates, such as locker rooms, showers and public pools; hence the name "athlete's foot. " This infection can itch and burn causing the skin on your feet and between your toes to crack and peel.

Tips For avoiding Athlete's Foot:

  • Keep your feet dry, allowing them to air out as much as possible
  • Wear socks that draw moisture away from your feet and change them frequently if you perspire heavily
  • Wear light, well-ventilated shoes
  • Alternate pairs of shoes, allowing time for your shoes to dry each day
  • Always wear waterproof shoes in public areas, such as pools, locker rooms, or communal showers
  • Never borrow shoes due to the risk of spreading a fungal infection

Treatment

A mild case of athlete's foot will generally clear up on its own with over-the-counter antifungal creams and sprays. But since re-infection is common due to its contagious nature, many people require prescribed anti-fungal medication to effectively treat the infection. Generally, it's always best to consult with your podiatrist before choosing a treatment.

Mild cases of athlete's foot can turn severe and even cause a serious bacterial infection. If you notice your rash has become increasingly red, swollen and painful or you develop blisters and sores, call our office right away. Athlete's foot left untreated could eventually spread to other body parts and infect other people around you.

With the right treatment, you'll be cured of your athlete's foot in no time, which means the sooner you can enjoy the activities you love without pain and irritation!

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
September 05, 2018

It’s nearing the end of the summer, and if you haven’t gotten a pedicure yet, you may start to feel like you’re due for one soon! The time we take to pamper ourselves is always time well spent. One thing is for certain - where you go for your pedicure can majorly impact your experience. This is especially true when you decide to include your child in the pedicure pampering! All of us at Family Foot & Ankle Care, P.C. challenge you to think ahead!

When you and your child go to get a pedicure, you’re putting your feet into warmer temperature waters that other peoples’ feet have been in as well. Soaking in warm temperatures will relax and open up your pores which, if there are any cuts or sores, will allow infection-causing bacteria to enter more easily. These bacteria can cause them to develop conditions like athlete’s foot and yeast infections, and can trigger or make diabetic foot ulcers worse for adults and kids with diabetes.

Bacteria can also impact your toes which can be affected by athlete’s foot and other toenail fungi. Your toes are also prone to ingrown toenails and the infections that can easily accompany them when your toenails are cleaned and clipped too aggressively. We know what you’re thinking - maybe getting a pedicure isn’t such a great idea...but it’s not all bad! The key to a great pedicure is knowing what to look for: when looking into where you and your child will get their first pedicure, be sure to look at the reviews!

Call ahead and ask if they’re kid-friendly. Visit and check out the facility before committing to it. It’s always a good sign to see cleaning supplies not only present but actively being used! A pedicurist gets major bonus points for having disposable tools and covers for the soaking tub used in pedicure chairs. This says a lot about how a business values the safety and health of its clients.

With all of the good and the bad laid out, we hope this will enable you to confidently pursue your next pedicure adventure and safely introduce pedicures to your child. If any complications arise, don’t hesitate to reach out to Dr. Alan J. Discont. Just call (408) 732-0033 to schedule your next appointment at our convenient location in Chandler, Arizona!

 

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
March 21, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions

One of the worst possible feelings to encounter is an itchy foot. It can be even more of a pain if that itchy foot is trapped within a shoe. Scratching it in public can be a tricky task. Do you take off the entire shoe? Shove a pencil inside and hope? When all else fails, you take off both your shoe and your sock and start scratching. After the initial relief finally comes, you take a peek at your foot and realize that you have a rash. Not only was it itchy, but it was also tender to the touch. Concerned you call your podiatrist and make an appointment to further investigate the cause of your itchy situation. A rash is a common symptom of an underlying condition, especially when it is situated on the foot. There are many different conditions that can cause a rash to pop up. Before you start panicking, read below to find out some of the more common causes of foot rashes.

Allergies – Allergies are a very common cause of rashes on the foot. Sometimes the allergen can be found in a sock, the shoe itself, or from a food or environmental component. Allergy symptoms can include itching, redness, swelling, rash, and tenderness. Sometimes blisters, lesions and scaly patches of skin affect the feet of those with allergies.

Athlete’s Foot – Athlete’s foot is one of the most common causes of an itchy rash on the feet. The root cause of athlete’s foot is due to a fungal infection that is passed from animals or humans. It is commonly picked up in public showers, gyms, and pools. It can be treated with over the counter anti-fungal creams. For more severe cases, it is recommended to see a podiatrist.

Infection – Infections can also cause rashes on the foot. Scabies, a type of infection, can cause a red patchy rash. The cause of scabies is due to tiny little mites. The rash appears as tiny little pimples or bug bites. It should be treated by a podiatrist or other medical professional to help prevent spreading.

Although allergies, athlete’s foot, and infection are some of the most common causes of rashes on the foot, there are many other conditions and diseases that could cause a rash. Unfortunately, unless they are examined by a podiatrist, it can be hard to discern the root cause of a rash. If your feet are itchy, red, or if you have another rash or foot condition, call Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC located in Chandler, Arizona. Call 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today. Learn about what rash is ailing your foot.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
January 25, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Athlete's Foot   gym   tineas pedis  

After hitting the gym and showering off in the locker room, you developed itchy, burning, flaky feet. At first, you thought they were just dry because of the winter weather. You tried lotions, Vaseline, and warm water soaks, but they still wouldn’t clear up. You made an appointment to see your podiatrist and learned that you are actually suffering from tineas pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot. Luckily for you, there are a wide variety of treatment options for the fungal disorder.

Over the Counter Options

Athlete’s foot sometimes responds well to over the counter medicines due to the nature of the fungus. One frequently prescribed over the counter medication is called Lamisil-AT. It is an effective fungal cream that typically begins to work after only a week of treatment. Other creams that also work are Desenex, Lotrimin, Monistat-Derm, and Tinactin. The later four usually require four full weeks of treatment before seeing results but also may be effective at curing the condition.

Is the condition persistent, or all over the sole and top of the foot? Then it requires a special antifungal treatment that a podiatrist can prescribe. Usually, a lotion or spray will not work due to the severity of the fungus. If this occurs or your infection lasts more than two weeks with over the counter treatment, it is important to see a podiatrist right away.

Treating Athlete’s Foot

A foot doctor can diagnose tineas pedis by simply examining the affected foot or feet. In some cases, the podiatrist must take a small scraping of the skin and examine it under a microscope to further evaluate the type of fungus that is causing your symptoms. Other times it is sent to a laboratory for testing. The method varies depending on symptoms and severity.

Once the diagnosis is confirmed, the podiatrist will recommend a series of treatment options depending on the length and severity of a patient’s case.

Are your feet itchy, burning, and red after being exposed to a public area that is known for moisture and warmth? Have the itchy and scaly symptoms traveled to your hands as well? This sounds like a case of tineas pedis, and should be treated by a podiatrist promptly. Call Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC located in Chandler, Arizona. Call 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today. There they can examine your feet and help determine whether you are suffering from athlete’s foot. If you are, they can help you develop a treatment plan that is right for you.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
September 07, 2017
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Tinea Pedis   Athlete's Foot  

It’s always nice to hit the pool or gym to exercise and get into shape. Most of us go to the locker room later on and hit the showers, and then continue with our day. However, those who have bare feet in the locker room or by the pool are prone to a virus that can cause athlete's foot, a fungal infection of the feet. Athlete's foot, also called tinea pedis, has existed for centuries. The first actual report of the condition occurred in 1908. It is a very rare infection, but does sometimes occur. Athlete's foot refers to a fungal infection in the soles of the feet. Almost everyone carries the virus and is exposed to it, but why some people actually develop symptoms is unknown.

Symptoms

  • White scaly skin
  • Itching of the bottom of the foot and in-between the toes
  • Red skin
  • Watery discharge
  • Lesion
  • Inflammation
  • Cracked skin

Prognosis

Those who suffer from athlete's foot have a good outcome if their condition is treated properly. Reinfection can occur easily if they are re-exposed to the fungus. Old shoes are usually a breeding ground for the disease. It is important to throw out all contaminated shoes and spray anti-fungal powder in any new shoes before wearing them.

Treatment

  • Anti-fungal medication
  • Anti-inflammatory medication
  • Cool compresses

Tinea Pedis can be treated relatively easily by a podiatrist. In order to prevent further flare ups or contracting the fungus all together, be sure to wear protective footwear when at the gym or by the pool. The fungus thrives in areas that are damp, warm, and moist. Use cotton socks and anti-fungal powder in your shoes to further assist yourself in preventing the disease.

Do you have dry, scaly patches appearing on the bottoms of your feet? Do you think your feet are looking as scaly as the dragons in Game of Thrones? Then it is time to call Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC in Chandler, Arizona right away. Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn can examine, diagnose, and treat your athlete's foot in a professional manner. Call 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today. We care about your feet!