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Posts for tag: Achilles Tendon Injury

Dominic BrownPhillies outfielder Dominic Brown suffered an injury to his Achilles that forced him to leave the field in the middle of the latest game against the Braves. Although manager Ryne Sandberg hopes Brown will come back to the team earlier than the end of September, he will be cautious not to rush his return.

Dealing with an Achilles tendon injury can be frustrating and a painful ordeal. However, an injury like this can be managed and taken care of by a podiatrist like Dr. Alan Discont of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC. Dr. Discont can examine your Achilles tendon as well as other foot and ankle injuries, and work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options.

Just What Is Achilles Tendinitis?

Those especially at risk of incurring Achilles tendinitis or even a rupture include people who overexert themselves during physical activity, namely athletes.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms Include:

  • Inflammation
  • Increased Blood Flow
  • Tendon Thickening
  • Slower Movement Time
  • Pain ranging from dull to severe

Achilles Tendon ruptures are caused by the tendon ‘snapping’ or ripping. There are often more painful and immediate as opposed to Achilles tendinitis. There are surgical and non-surgical methods in treating Achilles tendon ruptures, with recovery time possibly taking up to a year.

While no injury is completely avoidable, there are preventive measures that can lower your chances. This includes:

  • Incorporating strengthening exercises to your workout regimen such as squats and leg presses
  • Stretch your tendon before and after exercise
  • Wear comfortable, fitted footwear that is occasion-specific

And of course, if you believe you have injured your Achilles tendon be sure to visit a podiatrist immediately, as they can help diagnose and address your problem.

To learn more about Achilles Tendon, please follow link below.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our two offices which are located in Sun Lakes or Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more on Achilles Tendon.

By Alan J. Discont, DPM, FACFAS
September 03, 2013

Achilles TendonThe Achilles tendon is the strong band of tissue that connects the calf muscle to the heel bone. This lower leg tendon enables you to walk, jump, stand on your toes and climb stairs. You rely on it virtually every time you move your foot.

When the tendon is stretched beyond its normal capacity, a complete or partial tear may occur. Most Achilles tendon ruptures occur as a result of sport-related injuries when forceful jumping or sudden accelerations of running overstretch the tendon and cause a tear. Individuals with Achilles tendinitis -- weak and inflamed tendons -- are also more susceptible to tendon tears.

Signs of a torn Achilles tendon include:

  • Sudden, sharp pain in the back of the ankle and lower leg
  • Snapping or popping sensation at the time of the injury
  • Swelling down the back side of the leg or near the heel
  • Difficulty walking or rising up on the toes

The best treatment for a torn Achilles tendon is prevention. Avoiding this injury could save yourself months of rehab and extended time away from your game. Help prevent injury to your Achilles tendon by:

  • stretching your calf muscles regularly
  • limiting hill-running and jumping activities that place excess stress on the Achilles tendons
  • resting during exercise when you experience pain
  • maintaining a healthy weight
  • alternating high impact sports, such as running with low impact sports, such as walking or biking
  • wearing appropriate, supportive shoes with proper heel cushioning

If you suspect a ruptured Achilles tendon, visit Alan J. Discont, DPM, FACFAS as soon as possible. Until you can seek professional care, avoid walking on the injured tendon and keep it elevated. Ice the affected area to reduce pain and swelling and if possible, wrap the injured foot and ankle. For partial tears, swelling and pain may be less severe, but prompt treatment should still be administered.

Treatment for an Achilles tendon rupture can be surgical or non-surgical. Surgery to reattach the tendon is generally recommended, followed by rehabilitation, especially for individuals who want to return to recreational sports. Alan J. Discont, DPM, FACFAS can evaluate the severity of your tear and suggest the best treatment plan. With proper care, most people return to their former level of performance within six months.

Andrew SwallowAndrew Swallow of the Kangaroos suffered a torn Achilles tendon during a game against Melbourne. The 26 year old athlete fell to the ground in pain during the early third quarter and was taken to the hospital during the last quarter; with doctors certain Swallow suffered a full-blown rupture. Since the start of 2009, Swallow has not missed any games, though now the footballer faces at least a year on the sidelines. “It’s really disappointing for everyone associated, for our club and footy fans in general.” North Melbourne coach Brad Scott said.

Dealing with an Achilles tendon injury can be frustrating and a painful ordeal. However, an injury like this can be managed and taken care of by a podiatrist like Dr. Alan Discont of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC. Dr. Discont can examine your Achilles tendon as well as other foot and ankle injuries, and work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options.

Just What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in our bodies. As the tendon that connects the heel to the calf muscles, the Achilles tendon helps with even the most basic movement in the legs such as walking. As a result, the Achilles tendon can risk incurring Achilles tendinitis or even a rupture. Those especially at risk include people who overexert themselves during physical activity, namely athletes.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms Include:

  • Inflammation
  • Increased Blood Flow
  • Tendon Thickening
  • Slower Movement Time
  • Pain ranging from dull to severe

Achilles Tendon ruptures are caused by the tendon ‘snapping’ or ripping. There are often more painful and immediate as opposed to Achilles tendinitis. There are surgical and non-surgical methods in treating Achilles tendon ruptures, with recovery time possibly taking up to a year.

While no injury is completely avoidable, there are preventive measures that can lower your chances. This includes:

  • Incorporating strengthening exercises to your workout regimen such as squats and leg presses
  • Stretch your tendon before and after exercise
  • Wear comfortable, fitted footwear that is occasion-specific

And of course, if you believe you have injured your Achilles tendon be sure to visit a podiatrist immediately, as they can help diagnose and address your problem.

To learn more about Achilles Tendon, please follow link below.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our two offices which are located in Sun Lakes or Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more on Achilles Tendon.


High heels can cause back pain.High heel enthusiasts know the benefits of their beloved footwear; offering height and a fashionable appearance. However, according to writer Karen Appold of Lehigh Valley, PA; do the potential risks outweigh the benefits?

According to Appold, high heels affect your body’s gravity and alignment impacting back and posture support. High heels can also place your foot and ankle to turn in an outward position, causing risk and injury to your ankles. Another reason according to Appold is that back’s normal s-curve acts as a shock absorber, causing stress to be minimized on the vertebrae. High heel usage causes low-back spine flattening and displacement from the head and spine.

Wearing high heels can cause discomfort or difficulty in standing or walking, if you have concerns over the usage of high heels you should seek the aid of a podiatrist like Dr. Alan Discont of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC. Dr. Discont can provide you with more information on alternative footwear as well as further details on foot and ankle pain you may be experiencing from heels.

Wearing High Heels and How it Affects Feet

High heels affect what parts of the body?

· Joints in the Ankle
· Balls of the Feet
· Achilles Tendon
· Knees – heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
· Back – they decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  Also, the vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What problems can arise from long term use of high heels?

· Calluses
· Corns
· Morton’s Neuroma
· Plantar Fasciitis
· Bunions
· Hammertoe

For more information on maintaining proper foot health while wearing high heels, visit our link at the bottom.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our two offices which are located in Sun Lakes or Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more on High Heels and Feet.

Description: David Ortiz strained his right Achilles’ tendon last July 16.“Big Papi,” David Ortiz said on Monday in Fort Myers that he knows how valuable he is to the Red Sox offense, but he wouldn’t risk further injury by coming back too soon. Ortiz tried to do just that last season and he suffered a setback, which he is still trying to rehab.

“That’s the thing we pretty much are trying to avoid, coming back and not being able to stay in the lineup the way everybody expects me to be,” he said. “I’m going to push it depending on how I feel. I’m going to try to be smart about it. When I go back in, I want to be in. Setbacks are very frustrating.” Ortiz strained his right Achilles’ tendon last July 16. He came off the disabled list and played against the Royals Aug. 24, getting two hits and driving in two runs. However he aggravated his injury and didn’t return to play the rest of the season.

Dealing with anAchilles tendon injurylike Ortiz can be a painful ordeal. Luckily, an injury like this can be managed and taken care of by a podiatrist like Dr. Alan Discont of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC. Dr. Discont can examine your Achilles tendon, determine the severity of your injury, and work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options.

What Are the Most Common Injuries to the Achilles Tendon?

Tendon Ruptures:One may hear a popping or snapping sound if their Achilles tendon ruptures.  Symptoms are swelling, pain, and difficulty walking or bending the foot forward. There are surgical and non-surgical procedures available, and depending on the treatment you take, recovery can last up to a year from treatment.

Achilles tendinitis:Achilles tendinitis is the milder of the two injuries, and can be recognized by the following symptoms: inflammation, dull to severe pain, an increased flow of blood to the tendon, portions of the tendon growing in thickness, and a slower movement time. Tendinitis can be treated in many different ways and is often diagnosed by an MRI.

To learn more about how you can avoid injuries, like Achilles tendinitis please follow link below.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our two offices which are located in Sun Lakes or Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read our Article to learn more about Achilles tendon injuries.