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Posts for: February, 2018

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
February 22, 2018
Category: Proper Foot Wear
Tags: corns   Calluses   blisters   snowboarding   lacing   foot  

Snowboarding is a fun pastime that many people take part in during the winter. They go out, buy their gear, and have a weekend away in the tranquility of the snowy mountains. When buying gear, they are sure to have their board, their snow pants, jacket, mittens, goggles and even their snowboard boots. Snowboard boots are key to having a good experience while snowboarding. If you do not have the proper pair, then you can suffer severe injury. One key thing to look out for when buying snowboard boots is the lacing.

There are many types of snowboarding boots available on the market, and one of the biggest differences is the lacing. Although there are all sorts of pros and cons, it really comes down to the fact that there are many different lacing styles available. The most important thing is that it suits your preference and riding style.

Boa lacing systems feature a super-convenient twist-to-tighten cable reel design that also easily releases tension. This makes it ideal for getting boots on and off quickly. Boa dials are easy to operate even while you’re wearing bulky gloves. One of the drawbacks of lower-cost Boa lacing can be uneven pressure throughout the boot due to the inability to adjust the tension in specific areas. Higher-end Boa boots feature multiple reels and lacing zones to address this problem and help prevent blisters, calluses, and corns on your feet.

Speed lace systems combine convenience and customizable tension, as most designs feature multiple lacing zones that are individually adjustable. Most speed lacing systems tighten each zone with the yank of a handle, which then locks the lace into place. Unfortunately, this type of boot can also be prone to loosening or slipping if the lace isn’t properly locked into place. This can be a hazard when out on the slopes, especially if your foot slips out of the boot.

Traditional lace systems allow you the ability to fine-tune lace tension. While traditional laces take a little more time and effort to tighten and adjust, it’s tough to top the customizable fit and support they can provide. Their main inconvenience is that they usually take more time to strap on.

Snowboarding is a great activity, but if you choose the wrong lace style it can cause severe injuries such as a break or fracture of the foot. If you suffer from an injury due to poor fitting snowboard boots, do not panic! Call Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC located in Chandler, Arizona. Call 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today. A snowboarding injury can be fixed.


By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
February 20, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Surgery   Ankle Surgery  

Are your foot symptoms bad enough to warrant surgical interventions?Foot Surgery, Ankle Surgery

Have you been trying every treatment possible to help manage your foot problem? Are you not experiencing the relief you thought you would even after months of dedicated care? Are your foot or ankle problems affecting your day-to-day activities? If you said, “yes” to these questions, then it might be time to consider getting foot or ankle surgery. While surgery is often the last thing someone wants to think about it, here are some reasons why it might be needed.

What are the most common types of foot surgeries?

You might be surprised to learn about all the seemingly common conditions that could benefit from surgery. While these conditions don’t always warrant this kind of aggressive treatment, there are some cases in which it will. Here are some of the most common foot surgeries to consider:

  • Bunions
  • Hammertoes
  • Arthritis (of the foot and/or ankle)
  • Ankle replacement
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Morton’s neuroma
  • Achilles tendon rupture or injury
  • Tibialis posterior dysfunction

Why is surgery needed?

Most people with these issues above won’t require surgery to get a handle on their symptoms. Whether you do actually need to get foot surgery will really depend on several factors such as:

  • The severity of the pain
  • How long you’ve been experiencing pain
  • Whether or not you are responding to treatments
  • Your quality of life
  • Your personal needs

What are the advantages of foot surgery?

For those patients not finding relief through non-surgical methods, you may find that getting surgery could provide you with all the benefits you were hoping for including:

  • Reduced or completely eliminated pain
  • Improved mobility, function, and range-of-motion
  • The ability to wear shoes without discomfort or irritation
  • Improvement in the shape and appearance of your feet

Sometimes surgery is able to provide the quality of life that other nonsurgical options just can’t. You can always talk to your podiatric specialist to learn more about the treatments that are right for you.


By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
February 14, 2018
Category: Foot Care

When you are injured and have a hard time staying mobile, certain types of support devices can be used to help move you along.  Support device use dates back to 2830 BC. A common type of support device that is used in the podiatric world is crutches. Crutches are a T shaped, lightweight aluminum brace that helps you walk or take weight off of an injured ankle, foot, or leg. They absorb shock and are slip resistant and act like a second foot when yours is not doing so great.

For lower-limb injuries such as a broken leg, broken ankle, sprained ankle, knee injuries, and other injuries, as well as after surgery on the leg, knee, ankle, or foot, crutches remain useful today to decrease discomfort, reduce recovery time, and assist walking. Often when you get a cast put on your leg or foot, you will be required to use crutches for a period of time. Crutches may also be used by amputees, and people with other disabilities that make walking difficult.

How Do Crutches Work?

A crutch is responsible for doing two things: reducing the weight load on one of your legs and broadening your support base to improve your balance and stability. A crutch allows people with paralysis or other disabilities the benefits of upright posture and lets them maneuver in places they cannot go with a wheelchair.

A crutch is necessary when a person cannot walk or walks with extreme difficulty. Any person with leg or foot pain or injury, weak muscles, or an unstable gait may benefit from using a crutch or crutches. A podiatrist will let you know if crutches are necessarily based on your injury and its severity.

Crutches shift the force of upright movement from your legs to your upper body. You must have sufficient arm strength, balance, and coordination to use them effectively. If they are not used the right way, they can injure you.

Breaking a foot or ankle, or undergoing a surgery can be scary, especially if it affects your mobility. Luckily, crutches are available to assist you when you need to get around. If you need a set of crutches or instructions on how to properly use them, call our office. Call Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC located in Chandler, Arizona. Call 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today. Don’t let a broken foot keep you from moving around.


By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
February 13, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Diabetic Foot Care  

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, find out why your foot health is something you shouldn’t mess with.Diabetic Feet

When you find out you have diabetes it might feel like everything has suddenly changed. Now there is so much more to think about when it comes to your health. You’ll be given lifestyle changes to adhere to. You may need to exercise more. You may need to change your diet; lose weight. Of course, it’s also important that you consider your foot health in all of this.

“Why?” you may ask. Well, seemingly innocuous foot problems for healthy individuals may not cause issues but it actually could cause serious complications for those with diabetes. Those with diabetes are prone to nerve damage, neuropathy and circulation problems, which can cause a loss of feeling in the feet. Plus, even the smallest of injuries can turn into something more serious if left untreated.

So, what should you do to keep your diabetic feet healthy? Fortunately, there is a simple list of things that you can do every day to ensure that your feet don’t experience problems:

  • Examine your feet thoroughly everyday. This not only means the tops and sides but also the soles and in between your toes. If you are unable to do this yourself, turn to a friend or family member who can do it for you. Inspecting your feet daily will ensure that you catch a problem as quickly as possible.
  • Call a podiatrist if you notice any cuts, wounds, sores, redness, ingrown toenails or other problems. It may seem a bit odd to call your foot doctor about such seemingly insignificant foot problems but it’s always best to be safe rather than sorry. They can tell you whether it warrants a trip to the office.
  • Make sure to wash your feet everyday. Seems like a simple enough task, right? Just make sure you are actually spending time washing every area of your feet with soap and warm water. Dry your feet off completely once you get out of the shower.
  • It’s important to keep feet from drying out and you can easily help keep feet feeling smooth by applying a moisturizer every day. You should do this once you get out of the shower and dry off your feet to help lock in the moisture.
  • Wear socks and shoes everywhere, even if it’s indoors. Going barefoot could leave you prone to potential injury. This is particularly important if you have nerve damage or have lost sensation in your feet, as you may not know that you’ve stepped on something.

If you have diabetes it’s important that you have a podiatrist you can always turn to for the care you need whenever you need it most. Problems can arise suddenly and it’s important that you have a foot specialist you can trust in.


By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
February 08, 2018
Category: Exercise injury

In a physically challenging sport such as aerobics, injuries are common, and often involve the foot, ankle, and lower leg. Podiatrists say that most injuries from aerobics result from improper shoes, surfaces, or routines, and overuse of muscles through too vigorous a regimen. This can be detrimental to the foot, ankle, and legs as they need a lot of protection when they are constantly in use. If the feet and ankles are not protected, they can suffer from disorders such as bunions, heel spurs, plantar fasciitis, shin splints and more.

If you are attending an aerobics class, make sure it is led by a certified instructor. Hardwood floors, especially with padded mats, are the best surfaces possible for the feet and body during the high impact of the activity. If you can, start with a multi-impact class where you can start at a low-impact level and work your way up as your conditioning improves. This will allow your feet and ankles to get used to the vigorous activity and build up a tolerance. Be sure to give the feet and ankles breaks in between classes so that they can rest and heal.

Exercising at home with a video can be cost-efficient, but it is still important to be very careful. Read the label to determine whether the video is produced by certified aerobics instructors and whether you can handle the degree of impact. While it's safe to do low-to-moderate impact aerobics on the living room carpet, that's not a proper surface for high-impact routines. At-home aerobics can cause an array of foot and ankle problems if you have not done it before.

Any time you partake in aerobics, be sure to include a proper warm-up period. Make sure there are no rapid, violent movements. Knees should always be loose during warm-up. A static stretch held for 10 seconds can help avoid overstretching injuries as well.

Drink adequate water to avoid dehydration during workouts. Dehydration can cause nausea, dizziness, muscle fatigue, and cramping. For exercise lasting longer than 45 minutes, a sports nutrition drink may be superior to water.

Don't underestimate the importance of the cool-off period. It burns off lactic acid (which makes muscles feel tired) and adrenaline while keeping blood from pooling in the extremities.

Be sure to start slow. Unless you have been doing aerobics all of your life, it is not likely that you will be able to keep the pace of a professional who does it every day, multiple times a day. Be sure to invest in the proper equipment and footwear prior to the start of your regimen to prevent injury. If you do injure yourself while partaking in the activity, see a podiatrist right away. Immediate treatment of foot and ankle problems can prevent severe problems down the road. Call Dr. Alan J. Discont and Dr. Krahn of Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC located in Chandler, Arizona. Call 480-732-0033 or make an appointment online today. Don’t let the fear of an aerobic injury prevent you from enjoying it.