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Posts for: October, 2016

Oklahoma City Thunder announced that guard Cameron Payne sustained an acute foot fracture injury in late September. The injury occurred during an open scrimmage and was originally thought to be an ankle tweak. As Payne experienced symptoms of soreness, he had tests done, discovering he sustained a fracture. Payne suffered a previous stress fracture injury in the same bone in his foot, but stated that the injuries were unrelated. He had undergone surgery to repair the previous injury; it is unknown if Payne will need surgery again for his most recent injury.

Stress fractures can become painful if left untreated for an extended period of time. If you would like assistance in treating a stress fracture, contact Dr. Alan Discont of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Coping with Podiatric Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures occur on the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken as a result of overexertion or underuse.  As a result, the ankles and feet lose support when walking or running from the ground. Since these bones are not protected, they receive the full impact of each step. The stress on the feet causes the bones to form cracks.

What are Stress Fractures?

Stress Fractures are very common among those who are highly active and involved in sports or activities that make excessive use of their legs and feet. Stress fractures are especially common among:

-athletes (gymnasts, tennis players, basketball players)
-runners/joggers
-osteoporosis patients
-those who engage in high-intensity workouts

Stress Fracture Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures, and can be either constant or periodic. The pain is usually sharp or dull, accompanied by swelling and tenderness. Engagement in any kind of high impact activity will exacerbate the pain.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Stress Fractures


By Family Foot and Ankle Care, PC
October 17, 2016
Category: Foot Care

The metatarsal area is one of the most common sites for stress fractures. This article discusses the causes and treatments for these fractures.Metatarsal Stress Fractures

Stress fractures anywhere on the body are caused by repeated forceful activity. Considering that the feet bear a person's body weight for much of the day, they are very susceptible to stress fractures. The long bones in the feet, the metatarsals, are particularly prone to these injuries. But how are they diagnosed, treated and prevented?

Why metatarsal stress fractures happen

Certain activities or conditions can make stress fracturing the metatarsal bones more likely. Athletes who run, dance, or jump are at risk, as are those who suddenly boost their activity level after a long period of idleness. Osteoporosis (a disorder that causes weakness and brittleness of the bones) can also increase the likelihood of stress fractures.

Diagnosis and treatment

Widespread foot pain is usually the first sign of a metatarsal stress fracture. It may disappear with rest at first, but over time, the pain will be continual and concentrated into a specific area of the foot. Because stress fractures can be extremely small, an x-ray may not immediately detect it. Bone scans or MRIs are often more accurate. Special footwear can take the pressure off of the affected area and allow the fracture to heal. Depending on the location of the fracture, a cast may be applied and crutches may be required.

Prevention

Properly-fitted, quality footwear should always be worn during activity to support the feet. Alternating your activities (instead of focusing on one particular, repetitive action) will help to distribute the movements evenly. Diets rich in calcium and Vitamin D will help maintain bone integrity. It is also important to start any new physical activity slowly and work up at a gradual pace.

If you have been experiencing foot pain and believe it may be caused by a metatarsal stress fracture, contact your podiatrist for an evaluation today.


The Arizona Wildcats lost their running back, J.J. Taylor, as he sustained a broken ankle in late September. The injury was originally thought to be a sprained ankle, sustained during the second half of the loss to the Washington Huskies. At the time, it was thought that either Zach Green or Tyrell Johnson would replace him.

Broken ankles require immediate treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Alan Discont of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  • Swelling around the area
  • Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about broken ankles.


Rheumatoid arthritis can be described as a chronic autoimmune disease “that affects 1.3 million Americans, the majority of whom are women.” If left untreated, the condition can lead to eventual disability of the joints. However, early diagnosis and proper treatment can help with prevention of symptoms. Rheumatoid arthritis occurs when our body’s immune system begins attacking healthy tissue, particularly in the joints. This leads to stiffness, swelling, pain, and warm sensations in the joints. Rheumatoid arthritis can affect anyone of any age.

Understanding where RA starts will help treat and prevent the condition. If you are suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, contact Dr. Alan Discont of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks the membranes surrounding the joints. Severe pain and immobility are caused by an inflammation of the lining of your joints, and in worse cases the destruction of the joint’s cartilage and bone can occur.

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Feet

Although RA usually attacks multiple bones and joints throughout the entire body, many cases result in pain in the foot or ankle area. Pain will often initially present in the toes before the condition worsens and spreads throughout the entire foot.

Symptoms

  • Swelling and pain in the feet
  • Stiffness in the feet
  • Pain on the ball or sole of the feet
  • Joint shift and deformation

Diagnosis

Quick diagnosis of RA in the feet is important so that your podiatrist can treat the area effectively. Your doctor may ask you about your medical history and lifestyle to help determine possible causes of your RA.

Treatment

Unfortunately, there is no cure for RA, so treatment options are designed to specifically target the symptoms of it, most notably the pain it causes. Two types of anti-inflammatory drugs – non-steroidal or NSAIDs and corticosteroids – may be prescribed by your doctor. In some severe cases where the joints are too badly damaged, surgery may be an option. As always, speak with your podiatrist to help determine the appropriate treatment options available to you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about rheumatoid arthritis


By Family Foot and Ankle Care, PC
October 05, 2016
Category: Foot Care

Discover the telltale signs of a foot infection and what you can do to prevent diabetic­related foot problems.diabetic foot infection

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, you likely know all too well there is a significant chance you may deal with a foot complication. While foot problems for healthy individuals often go away on their own, when you have diabetes maintaining good foot health is vitally important. Since diabetics are at an increased risk for lower limb amputation, it’s important to check your feet everyday for signs of infection. Here are some common foot problems you may face:

Athlete’s foot: This fungal infection is characterized by itching, cracked, and red skin on the foot. While there are some over­the­counter treatments, if you have diabetes and are currently dealing with Athlete’s foot, we recommend talking to your podiatrist first. Your podiatrist may prescribe a stronger antifungal pill or cream to fight the infection.

Fungal nail infection: If you are suffering from brittle, discolored nails that are fragile and tend to crumble, then you may have a fungal infection. These nail infections are more difficult to treat, so talk to your podiatrist about whether oral medication or laser treatment is recommended.

Calluses/Corns: These are both the result of hard skin build up, with calluses developing on the bottoms of feet and corns developing on or between toes. These may develop from wearing shoes that rub against your skin. Sometimes using a corn pad can help cushion and protect the callus or corn from further damage while also promoting faster healing. However, talk to your podiatrist about certain medications that can help soften this condition.

Blisters: Just as friction from rubbing shoes can cause calluses and corns, they can also cause painful blisters. These blisters can become infected, and it’s important to leave blisters alone and not to pop them. Use an antibacterial gel or cream to help prevent infection and to protect the damaged skin.

Ulcers: These deep sores in the skin can easily become infected if not cared for properly. Poorly fitted shoes and even minor scrapes can cause ulcers to form. The sooner you seek treatment, the better your outcome. Talk to your podiatrist about the best treatment options for diabetic­related foot ulcers.

Ingrown toenails: An ingrown toenail is when the edge of the nail grows or cuts into the skin, causing pain, swelling, and irritation. If you trim your toenails too short, or you crowd your toes into tight shoes, you are more likely to develop this problem.

How do you prevent these foot problems in those with diabetes?

The best thing you can do is seek medical attention and treatment for your diabetes. If your condition is under control, then you’re less likely to deal with these complications. Be sure to also practice good hygiene when it comes to cleaning and drying off your feet. Also, examine your feet each day to check for any changes or problems that may need additional care. Always trim toenails straight across and do not round the nail; doing this will prevent ingrown toenails.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms then it’s time to see your podiatrist right away for treatment. The sooner you seek treatment the better the prognosis. Don’t put off your foot health.