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Posts for: August, 2016

Y:\Clearwater Marketing\Webpower Video\Webpower Stock Photos\plantar-fasciitis5.jpgFlip flops are easy to take on and off, however they are dangerous for your feet. Everyday flip flop use can cause plantar fasciitis. Stress fractures, tendinitis, and shin splints are also problems that stem from wearing flip flops too often. Flip flops that are too small for your feet might give you blisters and other infections. However, flip flops that are too big will cause you to slip and fall while you walk. Experts believe that well-fitting sneakers are the best option for your feet.

Wearing flip-flops for a long period of time can be harmful for the feet. To learn more, consult with Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will provide you with the foot- and ankle information you seek.

Flip-Flops and Feet

When the weather starts warming up, people enjoy wearing flip-flops.  Flip-flops are comfortable, stylish, and easy to slip on and off, perfect for any summer beach goer.  However, these shoes can cause harm to the feet.

How Can Flip-Flops Affect Me Long-Term?

  • Ankle problems
  • Hip problems
  • Lower back problems
  • Pain in the balls of the feet
  • Problems with foot arches
  • Changes in the way you walk

Are there injuries associated with flip-flops?

Yes.  Since flip-flops are relatively weak and do not provide the same amount of support as sneakers, people who wear flip-flops are more susceptible to injuries. On top of that, the open nature of the shoe makes your feet more prone to other problems, such as cuts and even infections.  Common injuries and ailments include:

  • Sprained ankles
  • Blisters
  • Infections
  • Cuts and Scrapes

If you have any questions, please contact one of our offices located in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Flip-Flops and Your Feet


Contrary to popular belief, Athlete’s foot equally affects both men and women, which opposes the long heralded idea that the condition mostly affects men. According to the dermatology department at South Korea’s Kyung Hee University Medical Center, of 676 patients treated for Athlete’s foot, 53.1% were male and 46.9% were female. People who wear shoes that don’t allow proper air circulation are especially prone to to developing the condition.

For more information about how to treat and prevent Athlete’s foot, consult with Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speaking to your podiatrist will give you a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as helping you figure out which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Athlete’s Foot


By Family Foot and Ankle Care, PC
August 15, 2016
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Bunion   Hallux Valgus  

Hallux ValgusHallux valgus may sound like a complicated, rare disease or a spell from the Harry Potter universe, but it's actually another name for bunions, a common foot disorder.

If your podiatrist has diagnosed you with hallux valgus, you may be a little taken aback. Don't worry,­ that's just a long name for a common foot disorder­ also known as a bunion. The hallux is better known as your big toe, and "valgus" means bent or twisted. These two words together describe exactly what a bunion is­ your big toe bent toward your other toes. Moving on to your next possible concerns: why does this problem exist and how can it be treated or prevented?

Hallux Valgus 101

Bunions form due to pressure on the two joints of the big toe. This toe becomes angled unnaturally inward and the bunion is the resulting deformity of the bone. Contrary to popular belief, they are not tumors or cysts. Bunions can present with pain, swelling, and increasingly limited range of motion.

Causes

Experts are divided on the cause of bunions: some believe that they are genetic, while others place the blame on years of wearing shoes that crowd the toes. In either case, shoes are thought to worsen hallux valgus deformities over time if they put pressure on the toes or contort the feet into abnormal positions. Since women's footwear is generally more narrow and confining than men's, bunions occur more often in them. While arthritis does not necessarily cause bunions, the joint inflammation can worsen them.

Treatment

Your podiatrist will likely recommend non­surgical options first. You should ensure that your shoes are comfortable and fit properly. Specialty shoe store employees can take measurements of your foot and recommend the best size. Shoe inserts or arch supports can be used to redistribute your weight and relax the muscles. For pain, over­the­counter analgesics like ibuprofen or naproxen are recommended.

If you continue you to have problems, surgery to remove some of the bone or surrounding tissue to straighten the foot back into position. A change in the shape of your foot or the way your shoes fit warrants a call to your podiatrist for evaluation.


Jodie Meeks of the Orlando Magic recently underwent surgery to stabilize the fifth metatarsal in his right foot. Meeks was originally acquired through a trade with the Detroit Pistons on June 29th. He will be out indefinitely, and his return will depend on his response to rehabilitation. The surgery was done on the broken bone that caused him to miss all but three games last season with the Pistons. Last season he averaged 7.3 points and 1.7 rebounds.    

If you require surgical consultation, consult with Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

When is Surgery Necessary?

Foot and ankle surgery is generally reserved for cases where less invasive procedures have been unsuccessful. Conditions that often require surgery are listed below:

- Removing foot deformities like bone spurs and bunions

- Severe arthritis that has caused bone issues

- Reconstruction for injuries caused by accidents or malformations

Types of Surgeries

The type of surgery you receive depends on the nature of the problem.  Possible surgeries include the following:

- Bunionectomy for painful bunions

- Surgical fusion for realignment of bones

- Nerve removal for painful nerve endings

Benefits of Surgery

Surgery can provide more complete pain relief than other options and may allow you to finally resume full activity.  Surgical techniques have also become increasingly sophisticated.  Techniques like endoscopic surgery allow for smaller incisions and faster recovery times.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Foot Surgery


During the summertime, many people choose flip-flops as their daily footwear of choice for their convenience and easy wearability. However while flip-flops are inexpensive and easy to wear, they can also cause certain foot and leg pain. Warmer weather often sees an increase in tendinitis, stress fractures, and other injuries that are exacerbated by wearing flip-flops. According to the American Podiatric Medical Association, flip-flops should be worn in moderation only at the beach, around a public pool, in locker rooms and public changing areas, and other areas in which protection from fungus and infection is needed.

 

Regardless of season or weather, everyday foot care should be practiced year round. For more information about everyday foot care, consult with Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will provide you with the foot- and ankle information you seek.

Everyday Foot Care

Often, people take care of their bodies, face and hair more so than they do for their feet. But the feet are a very important aspect of our bodies, and one that we should pay more attention to. After all, without our feet, we would not be able to perform most daily tasks. It is best to check your feet regularly to make sure there are no new bruises or cuts that you may not have noticed before, for example.

For dry feet, moisturizer can easily be a remedy and can be applied as often as necessary to the affected areas. Wearing shoes that fit well can also help you maintain good foot health, as well as making it easier to walk and do daily activities without the stress or pain of ill-fitting shoes, high heels, or even flip flops.

Also, wearing clean socks with closed shoes is important to ensure that sweat and bacteria do not accumulate within the shoe. Clean socks help to prevent athlete’s foot, fungi problems, bad odors, and can absorb sweat.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Everyday Foot Care