My Blog

Posts for: November, 2015

November 23, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Diabetes   Neuropathy   Nerve Damage  

A new article by Doctor Tipster has outlined 10 different tips for managing diabetes, which is great for any diabetic patient in order for them to understand the best ways to go about managing their diabetes. One of the specific aspects of this management is proper foot care. “You need to be very serious with your foot care. Diabetes can result in neuropathy or nerve damage. It starts in the feet and so if you take good care of your feet, then you will be safe.”

Diabetics must pay special attention to their feet to help prevent any complications. If you have diabetic foot concerns, consult with Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will provide quality care for your diabetic feet.  

Diabetic Foot Care

Diabetes affects millions of people every year. Diabetes can damage blood vessels in many parts of the body, including the feet. Because of this, taking care of your feet is essential if you have diabetes, and having a podiatrist help monitor your foot health is highly recommended.

The Importance of Caring for Your Feet

  • Routinely inspect your feet for bruises or sores.
  • Wear socks that fit your feet comfortably.
  • Wear comfortable shoes that provide adequate support.

Patients with diabetes should have their doctor monitor their blood levels because blood sugar levels play such a huge role in diabetic care. Monitoring these levels on a regular basis is highly advised.

It is always best to inform your healthcare professional of any concerns you may have regarding your feet, especially for diabetic patients. Early treatment and routine foot examinations are keys to maintaining proper health, especially because severe complications can arise if proper treatment is not applied.

If you have any questions, please contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Diabetic Foot Care


By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
November 18, 2015
Category: Foot Care

Ingrown Toenails An ingrown toenail is a common and painful condition of the toes. It occurs when one or both sides of the nail break grow into the skin of the toe, rather than over it. As a result, the irritated skin becomes painful, red and swollen. Fortunately, when detected early, an ingrown toenail can generally be treated effectively from home. But when left untreated, an ingrown toenail is prone to infection, as bacteria can enter your body via the penetrated skin. Professional treatment from your podiatrist is necessary to treat the infection. 

Self-Care for Ingrown Toenails

Regardless of the cause, understanding how to care for an ingrown toenail can go a long way to help prevent painful infections. In its earliest stage, an ingrown toenail can generally be cared for and successfully treated from home. For non-infected nails: 

  • Soak your foot in warm water several times a day to relieve swelling and soreness.
  • Wash and dry your foot to keep the affected area clean.
  • Wear comfortable footwear with a wide toe box, or sandals when weather permits.
  • Avoid cutting the nail, as this can make the condition worse.
  • Over-the-counter medications may temporarily ease the pain, though they don’t heal the underlying problem.

Conservative treatments won’t always be successful. When excessive swelling, pain or discharge is present, the toenail is most likely infected and should be treated by your podiatrist.  If you have diabetes or nerve damage, avoid home treatment and see your podiatrist for safe and professional care. 

Preventing Ingrown Toenails is Easy

With a few simple precautions, you can easily prevent ingrown toenails. 

  • Wear properly fitting shoes and socks that allow for adequate toe room.
  • Trim your toenails straight across, and avoid cutting them too short.
  • Keep your feet clean and dry, as this prevents bacteria formation.

Ingrown toenails are a very common condition of the toes. The key to avoiding ingrown toenails is to prevent them from occurring in the first place. Your podiatrist can administer treatment, such as an oral antibiotic or a minor surgical procedure, to stop the pain and remove the infection. Call today to schedule an appointment!


While sneakers were not always known as the most high fashion form of footwear, this year it seems as though they are making a comeback over high heels. Mostly known to have an association with sports performance, trends seem to have changed course for the shoe type. Footwear accessories editor from WGSN noted, “Now that people are used to having comfort features worked into their shoes it is really hard to go back.”

High heels can create a myriad of foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet contact Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because they are associated with femininity.  Despite their appeal, they can cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

What parts my body will be affected by high heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – may shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – they decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  Also, the vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What kinds of foot problems can develop from wearing high heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How can I still wear high heels and maintain foot health?

 If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock; you can buy either full inserts or metatarsal pads. 

If you have any questions, please contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about the effects of high heels.


Steven Finn of England will be out of the Test series against Pakistan due to a suspected stress fracture in his foot. The cricketer was ruled out of the first Test against Pakistan after complaining of soreness in his left foot while in the nets. Finn originally believed the injury to be a toenail problem before a scan revealed a more serious concern. Stress fractures can take up to six to eight weeks to heal properly, and full rest is need to ensure complete recovery.   

Stress fractures can become painful if left untreated for an extended period of time. If you would like assistance in treating a stress fracture, consult with Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont can determine the severity of your condition and provide you with quality care.

Coping with Podiatric Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures occur on the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken as a result of overexertion or underuse.  As a result, the ankles and feet lose support when walking or running from the ground. Since these bones are not protected, they receive the full impact of each step. The stress on the feet causes the bones to form cracks.

What are Stress Fractures?

Stress Fractures are very common among those who are highly active and involved in sports or activities that make excessive use of their legs and feet. Stress fractures are especially common among:

-athletes (gymnasts, tennis players, basketball players)
-runners/joggers
-osteoporosis patients
-those who engage in high-intensity workouts

Stress Fracture Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures, and can be either constant or periodic. The pain is usually sharp or dull, accompanied by swelling and tenderness. Engagement in any kind of high impact activity will exacerbate the pain.

If you have any questions, please contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Stress Fractures


By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
November 04, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Children's Feet   Kids Feet  

Taking Care of Your Child's Feet During the school year, your children maintain their normal school routine with frequent activities and are constantly on the go. In order to maintain their busy schedules it is vital that their feet are protected against the aches and pains of non-stop daily activities. From infants and toddlers to high school kids, the need for continual foot relief is constant. Pain in your child’s foot or ankle is never normal, as there is no such thing as "growing pains." Your podiatrist  should evaluate any pain that lasts more than a few days, or that is severe enough to limit the child’s walking, as soon as possible.  

Infants and Toddlers

Whether your infant or toddler is in school or daycare, their feet need extra protection early on to promote healthy feet later on in their lives. The size and shape of your baby’s feet change dramatically during their first year. Too much pressure or strain can affect the shape of their feet as a baby’s feet are flexible. When choosing shoes for your baby make sure their shoes and socks do not squeeze the toes as this can cause damage to their precious toes. 

As your infant continues to grow, it is important not to force your toddler to walk before he or she is ready to. Once your toddler does begin to walk, watch your toddler’s gait – the way in which they walk. Many toddlers may have a pigeon-toed gait, which is normal, while some initially learn to walk landing on their toes instead of their heels. Most children will outgrow both of these problems, but other conditions detected early can be treated more easily.  

Proper Shoes for Your Children

Before you head to the store to buy your kids shoes, follow some simple guidelines provided by your podiatrist to prevent or minimize foot problems from poorly fitting or worn out shoes. Your child’s feet can grow up to two sizes in six months, so you need to account for growth when purchasing new shoes. This doesn’t mean that you need to buy shoes that are too big, as oversized shoes cause the foot to slide forward, putting excessive pressure on the toes. A well-fitting shoe has about a finger’s width from the end of the shoe to the tip of the big toe.  If your child’s shoes are too tight, they can cause blisters, corns, calluses, or ingrown nails that become can become infected.  

Shoes will lose their shock absorption over time, so it is important to inspect new and old shoes for proper cushioning and arch support.  If your child’s shoes exhibit wear and tear around the edges of the sole, replace them with new shoes that have adequate support. When buying new shoes, check to see that the toe box flexes easily and the shoe does not bend in the middle of the sole. Worn-out shoes elevate the risk for heel pain, Achilles tendonitis, and even ankle sprains – be sure to replace then as soon as possible.  

Remember to check your child’s shoe size often, as they will continually change shoe sizes as they grow. With your podiatrist’s care, the risk of bone problems can be reduced. Contact your podiatrist today if your child is experiencing any pain in their feet due to injury or abnormal growth.