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Posts for: October, 2015

When it comes to foot therapy, many patients will turn to typical methods such as physical therapy to get themselves back on their feet. One alternative called reflexology, however, is a practice that--despite its intrigue--has been around for many years. Reflexology works on the principle that applying pressure to the feet can ease pain elsewhere. Many clients of reflexologists use the therapy to ease pain throughout the body, such as the back, the head, or the stomach.  

Foot therapy is necessary for those recovering from both foot deformities and foot injuries. If you have concerns regarding therapy, speak to Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont can answer any of your podiatric questions.

Most common injuries

People who are constantly on their feet are prone to a variety of injuries. Therefore, it is important to take part in physical therapy in order to get back on the right track quickly.

What to do when injured

Physical Therapy – This specialized treatment will focus on the affected area, speeding up recovery and the overall healing process. This is important for those wanting to get back into the game quickly. It is a proven method that has helped millions of people return from any injury.

During physical therapy you will undergo regimented training to get back into full form. Training is often very difficult, especially at first when the foot feels weak. These are some steps physical therapy often involves:

  1. Basic stretching & twisting exercises – getting the feet’s mobility and flexibility up.
  2. Massaging – the therapist will massage the injured area in order to activate the muscles and relax them.
  3. Strengthening Exercises – this allows the muscles in the affected area to regain their full strength, a vital step towards full recovery.

If you have any questions, please contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Foot Therapy


Ramona Michel of Fishkill was one of six runners who were crowned as champions at the 37th annual Dutchess County Classic in September. Michel suffered a fractured right pinkie toe three weeks before the event when she accidentally banged her foot against the base of her son’s crib. Despite the injury, Michel refused to skip the race. “It was throbbing after about a mile,” she shared. “But I never thought about stopping. I was just thinking about seeing my family at the end, knowing they’d be proud of me.”

A broken toe is extremely painful and needs immediate attention. If you have any concerns about your feet contact Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • throbbing pain
  • swelling
  • bruising on the skin and toenail
  • the inability to move the toe
  • toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions, please contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about broken toes.


By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
October 16, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Toenail Fungus A fungal infection in one of your toenails can be both uncomfortable and unsightly. To fix the problem, there are both topical and oral treatments that can be used. If you are suffering from a fungal toenail, see your podiatrist as soon as possible. 
 
Fungal toenails tend to affect older men most frequently. As you get older, there is a diminished flow of blood to your toes and a longer period of exposure to fungi. Here are a few more of the most common factors that can increase your chances of getting a fungal toenail:
  • Walking barefoot in wet public areas. Walking without shoes in swimming pools, showers or gyms can increase your chances of a fungal infection.
  • Sweating heavily. If your feet are constantly sweaty, fungus will be more likely to survive and thrive near your toes in your shoe. 
  • Diabetes. Diabetes restricts the flow of blood to the extremities. Because of this, your immune system will be less prepared to fight off the fungal infection.
  • Poor shoes. If you wear shoes that do not ventilate or effectively absorb perspiration well, fungus will be able to thrive near your feet. 

Options To Treat Fungal Toenails

There are over the counter creams and ointments available, but they are generally not as effective as prescribed medications from your podiatrist. When you see your podiatrist, depending on the severity of the infection, they will usually prescribe either an oral medication or a topical cream. 
 
Oral medications are generally taken for 6 to 12 weeks. They work by helping a new nail to grow without any infection, and because of this, the infection resolves somewhat slowly. It will take roughly four months for the nail to truly heal. Your podiatrist may also prescribe a topical medication that you will apply directly to your toenail. 
 
In the most extreme cases, your podiatrist may perform surgery to remove your nail. If this happens, your nail will grow back very slowly, possibly taking up to a year to fully grow back.
 
To learn more about how to treat your fungal toenail or to schedule an appointment, contact your podiatrist today!

With cooler weather now in full effect, many people will be lacing up their running shoes to get started on running season. While injuries are common and bound to occur, there are several measures one can take to avoid the five most common injuries: runner’s knee, Achilles tendonitis, hamstring injuries, iliotibial band injuries, and plantar fasciitis. Stretching and strengthening the involved muscles is key in avoiding injury and should be done before and after workouts.  

Runners can still be prone to running injuries even with proper precautions. If you are suffering from a running injury see Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will provide you with quality treatment and assist you with all of your foot and ankle concerns.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

Many common running injuries are caused by overuse and overtraining. When the back of the kneecap starts wearing out and starts causing pain in your knee, this is commonly referred to as runner’s knee. Runner’s knee is a decrease in strength in your quadriceps and can occur if you’re not wearing properly fitted or supporting shoes. To prevent runner’s knee, focusing on hip strengthening is a good idea, as well as strengthening your quads to keep the kneecaps aligned.

What Are Some Causes of Running Injuries?
- One cause of a common running injury is called iliotibial band syndrome.
- Plantar fasciitis is also another common injury.
- Stress fractures can occur from overtraining, lack of calcium, or even your running style.

Best Ways to Prevent Running Injuries
- Wear footwear that fits properly and suits your running needs.
- Running shoes are the only protective gear that runners have to safeguard them from injury.
- Make a training schedule. Adding strengthening exercises as well as regular stretching can help keep you strong and limber and can lessen the possibility of injuries.
- Stretching keeps muscles limber, this will help you gain better flexibility.

If you have any questions, please contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about how to Prevent Running Injuries


Recent research involving both humans and mice with chronic ankle instability (CAI) has discovered that those with the condition walk run and less than those without. The 40-person study tracked the steps of 20 people with CAI and 20 without. Those who had developed CAI averaged fewer steps than those without the condition. While it was noted that CAI itself is not especially dangerous, over time a severe ankle sprain could be reason for less physical activity in the future if it is not taken care of properly at the time of injury.  

Ankle sprains are very pain and inconvenient. If you have any concerns about your foot and ankle needs contact Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains take place when the ligaments in your ankle are torn or stretched beyond their limits. There are multiple ways that the ankle can become injured, including twisting or rolling over onto your ankle, putting undue stress on it, or causing trauma to the ankle itself.

What are the Symptoms?

  • Mild to moderate bruising
  • Limited mobility
  • Swelling
  • Discoloration of the skin (depending on severity)

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits can aid in prevention

Treatment of a Sprain

Treatment of a sprain depends on the severity.  Many times, people are told to rest and remain off their feet completely, while others are given an air cast. If the sprain is very severe, surgery may be required.

If you have suffered an ankle sprain previously, you may want to consider additional support such as a brace and regular exercises to strengthen the ankle.

If you have any questions, please contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about ankle sprains.