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Posts for: September, 2014

http://2-ps.googleusercontent.com/x/www.broadwayworld.com/images.bwwstatic.com/columnpic6/250xNxicon-fitness.jpg.pagespeed.ic.GKYM9vkZCR.jpgA podiatric conference known as The Annual Scientific Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) focused on women who are affected by neuromas. Women are generally said to be more likely to developing foot and ankle conditions due to the choice of footwear.

Kris DiNucci, who presented at the conference, stated that active women who either possess flat feet or regularly wear narrow shoes are more likely to develop neuromas. Morton’s Neuroma, which occurs between the third and fourth toe, tends to be the most common neuroma in the feet.

Morton’s neuroma can be a difficult condition to contend with. If you are experiencing symptoms of Morton’s Neuroma, talk to podiatrist Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont can diagnose and treat your feet accordingly.

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the third and fourth toe and the ball of the foot, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible to this condition. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.  Women are more likely than men to have an occurrence of this foot condition.

What Increases the Chances of having Morton’s Neuroma?

-Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot area.
-Jogging, running and any sports that involve constant impact to the foot area.
-Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformity may put you at a higher risk for developing Morton’s neuroma.

If you suspect that you may have this condition, you should visit your podiatrist. A podiatrist will first conduct a thorough physical examination to check for palpable masses between the bones of the foot.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

For more information on the treatment of diabetes, visit our link below.

Read more on Morton’s Neuroma


 Brandi Schlossberg advocates the use of orthotics, believing they can help address painful foot and ankle conditions such as plantar fasciitis. Foot orthotics work can treat plantar fasciitis, for example, by reducing the pressure being placed on the heel. Additionally, they can help spread shock absorbed by the foot.  

Orthotics can also improve the foot’s biomechanics of the feet. Of course, having good or improved biomechanics can prevent or reduce the likelihood of plantar fasciitis in the first place. However, as with any treatment, Schlossberg advises consulting with a physician first before investing in foot orthotics.

Foot orthotics serve a wide range of usefulness when it comes to foot and ankle conditions. If you are undergoing discomfort in your feet, see Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont can treat your foot and ankle needs.  

What are Ankle Foot Orthotics?

Orthotics are physical aids used to support weak limbs or direct the proper function of limbs. Often they are used to support the ankle and foot. Such orthotics are known as AFOs. AFOs help strengthen the muscles or train them to function in the proper position. AFOs can also benefit muscles that need to be lengthened or loosened.

Why might you need orthotics?

Orthotics are often prescribed when someone is suffering from diseases that affect the musculature, like polio and multiple sclerosis. However, more common conditions like arthritis and stroke, or those that “toe in”, may also require orthotics.

Modern orthotics have improved dramatically from the metal braces of previous years. Many of today’s orthotics are made of lightweight plastics and other advanced materials to provide new levels of comfort and support. Often the orthosis is designed in a rigid L shape that is contoured to the calf and flesh colored.

For more information about Ankle Foot Orthotics, please follow the link below.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Foot Ankle Orthotics


By Alan J. Discont, DPM, FACFAS
September 15, 2014
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Sprains   Fractures  

Sprained AnkleHave you ever twisted your ankle while participating in a sport?  Or maybe you simply slipped while walking?  Either way, ankle sprains and fractures should not be ignored.  Ankle sprains are common injuries that occur when ligaments are stretched or torn, with nearly 85% occurring laterally, or on the outside of the ankle joints. By visiting your podiatrist in Chandler , you can receive the care you need to get back on your feet.

Symptoms of a Sprained or Fractured Ankle

Your symptoms upon spraining your ankle may vary depending on the severity of your pain and how it occurred. The symptoms of an ankle sprain may include:

  • Pain or soreness
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Difficulty walking
  • Stiffness in the joint

All ankle sprains will produce some level of pain at the time of your injury and the joint will also feel tender, beginning to swell.  If your sprain is mild, you may experience a slight loss in the function of your joint.

With a more serious sprain, you will most likely fall during the initial impact of the injury.  It will often be difficult to move or put weight on your injured ankle, producing bruising and swelling from the ankle to the foot.  Once you have had ankle sprains or other ankle injuries before, you may have a weakened joint that creates more of a chance for future injuries to take place.

Common symptoms of an ankle fracture are similar to ankle sprains, and include:

  • Pain to touch
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Inability to walk on the leg
  • Deformity around the ankle

Treatment and Prevention

Treatment for your ankle sprain begins with self-care.  The RICE evaluation is highly recommended upon the initial onset of your injury:

  • Rest
  • Ice
  • Compression
  • Elevation

When your podiatrist feels you are ready to begin participating in sports and exercising, you can help prevent further sprains and fractures by wearing an ankle brace during the first initial months of being back on your ankle.  Special wraps are also available to protect your ankle. 

If your symptoms still persist after taking the initial step of at-home-care, or if you suspect you might have a fracture, a visit to your Chandler podiatrist may be in order.  With a consultation with Family Foot and Ankle Care, PC, your ankle sprain or fracture can be treated and further prevented.  There is no need to put an end to your athletic lifestyle with recurring ankle injuries.


The insurance companies of patients with hammertoes may require their patients to attempt non-surgical treatments before agreeing to pay for corrective surgery. Non-surgical treatments can involve the use of non-invasive methods such as a custom-made orthotic insert to decrease discomfort or a splint to hold the hammertoe in the correct position if it can still be straightened. Non-medicated pads can also be added to the top of the deformed joint to protect the toe from rubbing against the shoe. Invasive methods include the use of analgesic or anti-inflammatory drugs to help ease pain and swelling, as well as cortisone injections. In general, prevention of exacerbation involves wearing properly fitted shoes that leave a gap of at least half an inch between the longest of your toes and the tip of the shoe and avoiding wearing high heels.

For successful hammertoe correction you may require the help of a health professional. If you would like treatment for a hammertoe, see podiatrist Dr. Alan Discont, D.P.M. of Family Foot and Ankle Care. Dr. Discont will provide you with quality treatment and attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

Hammertoe

Hammertoe is little-known a painful condition that affects the second, third and fourth toes involving different joints of the toe and foot. Hammertoe can be caused by many other conditions such as RA (rheumatoid arthritis), osteoarthritis, trauma or injuries to your foot, it can be hereditary and it can also be caused by a cerebral vascular accident. If you wear shoes that are too narrow or short for your feet, it may exacerbate any pain you already have.

It is really important to your overall well-being to seek out medical attention at the first signs of foot pain or anything that may hinder your ability to walk in a normal manner. Taking care of your feet is one of the first steps to being able to live a full and healthy life.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Chandler, AZ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Hammertoes


By Alan J. Discont, DPM, FACFAS
September 05, 2014
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Gout  


Foot Pains“Oh, my aching feet!” How many times have you found yourself yelling, “Oh, my aching feet,” but then shrugged it off, figuring that aching feet are a natural part of life? You don’t have to put up with aching feet.  Your podiatrist in Chandler urges you to not ignore that ache in your feet.  When pain occurs, it is the first sign that something isn’t right, so a trip to Family Foot and Ankle Care, PC is in order.

Gout is a form of arthritis, and it can often cause extreme pain to your feet.  Approximately one million Americans suffer from gout, and although its source is a systemic problem within the body, there are some suggestions for how to treat gout that may help reduce your chance of having a gout flare-up. 

Diagnosis and Treatment

Because the joint inflammation of gout can resemble that of a joint infection or other form of arthritis, diagnosing gout requires removing a small amount of fluid from the joint and examining it for uric acid crystals.  Once diagnosis is made, your podiatrist in Chandler can recommend a gout treatment plan to help:

  • Stop acute attacks
  • Rapidly relieve pain and inflammation
  • Avert future attacks
  • Prevent the development of tophi, kidney stones and kidney disease   

Gout treatment will most likely involve anti-inflammatory medications to relieve acute pain and inflammation, as well as urate-lowering drugs to control urate levels and prevent future attacks.

Other gout treatment strategies might include the following:

  • Avoid foods with high purines, such as organ meats, anchovies, shellfish, bacon and gravies, and increasing intake of dairy foods.
  • Avoid alcohol, which increases the production of urate and impairs excretion
  • Lose weight to reduce blood urate levels
  • Avoid medications that contribute to hyperuricema, including diuretics

With proper treatment by your Chandler podiatrist, gout is one of the most controllable forms of arthritis.  So when pain occurs, don’t just deal with it, seek treatment immediately.