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Posts for: January, 2014

bunion surgeryNational League for Democracy leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is having a harder time recovering from bunion surgery than expected, and may not be able to attend the rallies for constitutional amendments that she planned for this month. According to an official from the NLD’s information department, confirmation on this will have to wait until she’s had more check-ups.

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s surgery was completed without complications and her recovery is going smoothly, but she is too weak to stand up for long. She was unable to go to a rally in Maubin she had planned on being present at, and her family doctor suggested holding off on all public appearances for a while.

Bunions are very painful and can make walking and wearing shoes difficult. If you have bunions and want help dealing with them, consider talking to a podiatrist like Dr. Alan Discont of Family Foot and Ankle Care, PC. Dr. Discont can present you with a range of treatment options and help you decide on the best one.

What is a Bunion?

A bunion is an enlargement of the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The enlargement is formed of swollen tissue or boney growth. This swelling is caused by a shifting of the bones in the big toe inward, impacting the other toes of the foot. The area around the base of the big toe may become inflamed, red, and/or painful.

Formation

Genetics – people who are susceptible to bunions are often genetically predisposed.

Stress on the feet – wearing improperly fitting shoes or running and walking with improper form may cause stress on the feet. Wearing high heeled shoes puts the weight from the body onto the toes, causing further stress and bone displacement.

Diagnosis

A podiatrist who specializes in foot structure and bio-mechanics will be able to diagnose bunions.

Blood Tests - testing the blood for gout or arthritic conditions can help identify the causes.

Radiological Exam – a podiatrist will request an exam to identify the bunion by taking a look at the bone structure.

For more information about Bunions, follow the link below.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to fit your needs.

Read more about Bunions.


By Alan J. Discont, DPM, FACFAS
January 23, 2014
Tags: Rest   Foot Injuries   RICE   Ice   Compression   Elevation  

Common Foot InjuriesAn unexpected fall or twist can result in an injury of the foot or ankle, such as a sprain or strain. Immediate first aid can help prevent complications, reduce pain and improve recovery.

Rest, ice, compression, and elevation, commonly referred to as R.I.C.E., is the first and best treatment for minor injuries. The following tips can aid in the early treatment of common foot and ankle injuries to help reduce swelling and control the inflammatory process during the initial phase of injury.

Rest.   Whether you have a strain or a sprain, rest from any physical activity is essential to protecting your injured ligaments, tendons or muscles from further damage while your body starts the repair process.  Avoid putting weight on the injured foot or ankle as much as possible. In some cases, complete immobilization may be required.

Ice.  Gently ice your foot or ankle with ice wrapped in a towel in a 20-minute-on, 40-minute-off cycle for the first few days post-injury. Ice is excellent at reducing inflammation and pain. 

Compression. Applying some type of compressive wrap or bandage to an injured area can greatly reduce the amount of initial swelling.

Elevation.  Prop your foot up while lying down or sitting so that it is higher than or equal to the level of the heart.

After a few days of R.I.C.E., many acute injuries will begin to heal. If pain or swelling does not subside after a few days or if you are unsure of the severity of your injury, make an appointment with your Chandler podiatrist.   A skilled podiatrist can properly diagnose your injury and recommend the best course of treatment.


Aaron DobsonNew England Patriots wide receiver Aaron Dobson had to miss the team’s last practice to because of a stress fracture in his left foot. Dobson hurt himself during the Patriots’ game against the Bills in week 17.

Luckily New England had a bye during the first round of the playoffs, giving the wide receiver time to rest, but the team is still uncertain if he’ll be recovered enough in time to play the next game. The Patriots have experienced an unusually high amount of injuries in their offense this season, although they have several backups ready to take over for Dobson.

Stress fractures are extremely painful and usually require the care of a medical professional. For help dealing with fractures and other injuries, talk to a podiatrist like Dr. Alan Discont of Family Foot and Ankle Care, PC. Dr. Discont can determine the severity of your problem and recommend a variety of viable treatment options.

Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

Stress Fractures occur on the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken from too much or too little use.  Then the feet and ankles lose support when walking or running from the impact of the ground. Since there is no protection the bones receive the full impact of each step. The stress on the feet causes cracks to form in the bones, thus called stress fractures.

What are Stress Fractures?

Common among individuals whose daily activities cause great impact on the feet and ankles. Stress factors are most common among:

-runners                                 
-people affected with Osteoporosis
-play tennis or basketball
-gymnastics
-high impact workouts

Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures, and can be constant or intermittent. It will often cause sharp or dull pain with swelling and tenderness. Engaging in any kind of activity which involves in high impact will aggravate pain.

Treatment

The individual and the degree of injury depend on the fracture of the foot. Some fractures heal very fast while others take a long times and one would need crutches.

- Surgery with support pins around the fracture helps
- A great intake of Calcium and Vitamin-D helps for strong bones

For more information about Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle, follow the link below.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to fit your needs.

Read more about Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle.


Obesity and your feetA study conducted in Denmark showed children who are overweight or obese are more susceptible in injuring their feet, ankles, and legs during physical activity. Over two and a half years, the group of 632 heavyset children studied accumulated 673 lower-limb injuries during their weekly ninety minutes of physical activity.

While children at lower weights hurt themselves about 4.4 times per every 1000 engagements in exercise, obese kids hurt themselves 5.3 times for every 1000 engagements. "In the bigger picture the need to get all kids more active, and particularly overweight children, is imperative," sports medicine researcher Malachy McHugh said.

Being obese puts additional stress on the feet and can increase the probability of injury. If you are obese and want to learn how to care for your feet, see a podiatrist like Dr. Alan Discont of Family Foot and Ankle Care, PC. Dr. Discont can instruct you on what to look out for to avoid irritating health complications.

Obesity and your Feet

Since your feet are what support your entire weight when standing, any additional weight can result in pain and swelling. Being overweight is one of the main contributors to foot complications.

Problems & Complications

Extra Weight– Even putting on just a few extra pounds could create serious complications for your feet. As your weight increases, your balance and body will shift, creating new stresses on your feet. This uneven weight distribution can cause pain, even while doing the simplest tasks, such as walking.

Diabetes– People who are overweight are at serious risk of developing type-2 diabetes, which has a drastic impact on the health of your feet. As you get older, your diabetes might worsen, which could lead to loss of feeling in your feet, sores, and bruises. You could also become more prone to various infections.

Plantar fasciitis – Pressure and stress that is placed on muscles, joints, and tendons can trigger plantar fasciitis, which is an inflammation of tissue that forms along the bottom of the foot.  The pain and stiffness involved with this condition can be so debilitating that the act of walking becomes an issue.

For more information about Obesity and Your Feet, follow the link below.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact our office in Chandler, AZ. We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to fit your needs.

Read more about Obesity and Your Feet.


By Alan J. Discont, DPM, FACFAS
January 10, 2014
Category: Foot Care

Running Shoes

If you’re a runner, then you know that your shoes are an integral piece of equipment when it comes to comfort, performance and injury prevention.  Your foot type and function will determine which type of running shoe will be best for your unique needs and training regimen. A shoe must properly fit the shape and design of your foot before you can train in it comfortably.

There are several factors to consider when searching for a new running shoe. These may include:

  • Foot structure
  • Foot function
  • Body type
  • Existing foot problems
  • Biomechanical needs
  • Training regimen
  • Environmental factors
  • Previously worn running shoe

Failing to replace old, worn shoes is a major cause of running injuries, as old shoes gradually lose their stability and shock absorption capacity. The typical lifespan of a pair of running shoes is approximately 500 miles. It’s important to keep track of their mileage to avoid overuse.

Helpful tips for choosing your shoes include:

  • Go to a reputable shoe store that specializes in running footwear
  • Bring your old/current running shoes with you
  • Know your foot type, shape as well as any problems you’ve previously experienced
  • Have your feet measured
  • Wear the same socks you wear when training
  • Try on both shoes, and give them a test run

If you’re a beginning runner and just starting your training regimen, then it’s a good idea to visit Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC for an evaluation. Your podiatrist will examine your feet, identify potential problems, and discuss the best running shoes for your foot structure and type.Seasoned runners should also visit their Chandler podiatrist periodically to check for potential injuries.

Don’t allow poor shoes choices derail your training program and jeopardize your running goals.  A proper-fitting running shoe is an invaluable training tool that allows you to perform your best without injury or pain. The correct footwear, in combination with a proper training routine and professional attention from a skilled Chandler podiatrist is the key to minimizing faulty foot mechanicsand maximizing your performance.