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By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
October 19, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Warts  

What Causes Warts?

Got foot warts? Nearly everyone will have a wart at some point in their lives. Warts are typically small, hard skin growths caused by an infection with humanpallilloma virus. Foot warts are treatable. Foot warts are among the most common dermatologic conditions podiatrists treat. Read on to learn about the causes of warts.

An HPV Infection

Common warts are caused by by an HPV infection. Over 100 types of HPV exist. Certain types of HPV infection cause cervical cancer. Some types of HPV infection cause foot warts, while others cause warts that appear on the face, neck, or hands. Of the 100 types of HPV, about 60 cause common warts on areas such as the hands or feet.

Skin-To-Skin Contact

Wart viruses are contagious. You can get foot warts from skin-to-skin contact with people who have warts. However, not all HPV strains are highly contagious. You can get the wart virus by touching an object that another person's wart touched, such as clothing, towels, shoes, or exercise equipment.


Breaks in Your Skin

HPV infects the top layer of skin and usually enters the body in an area of damaged or cut skin. Cuts from shaving can provide an avenue for infection. Getting a scrape can also bring on common warts. Foot warts are very common in swimmers whose feet are scratched by rough pool surfaces.

A Weak Immune System

In most cases, your immune system defeats an HPV infection before it creates a wart. Someone with a weakened immune system is more vulnerable and therefore more likely to develop warts. Immune systems can be weakened by HIV or by immunosuppressant drugs used after organ transplants.


If you want to get rid of foot warts, see your podiatrist as soon as possible. Many types of effective wart treatments are available. They include salicylic acid, cantharidin, cryotherapy, laser treatment, and surgery. Your podiatrist can help you get rid of foot warts once and for all!

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
October 16, 2018
Category: foot deformities
Tags: Orthotics   Bunion   supportive shoes  

Have you ever wondered why some people have big toes that point inward towards their other toes, or have a big, red, bulbous appearance at the base of their big toe? Chances are you were looking at a pretty advanced cased of bunions! You can tell a bunion is very far along in its development when the base of the big toe bone looks red, inflamed, and is abnormally large. This is the product of a bone deformity called a bunion. The area where your big toe bone meets the other parts of your foot bones forms a bony growth that pushes the big toe inward. The deformity leading to a bunion is typically caused by the toe bone being forced to grow in an abnormal direction.

This can be due to shoes with poor support, shoes that are too small for your feet, and can sometimes even happen simply because of your genetic makeup! Of all the things to inherit, a bunion isn’t the most enjoyable. Bunions can range from barely noticeable to being a very uncomfortable and even painful experience. Here are some tips and tricks from all of us at Family Foot & Ankle Care to help you avoid developing bunions:

Ask your family - it never hurts to simply ask your family what their experience has been with bunions. Did they ever get it treated? When did it start developing?

Get fitted shoes - this is by far one of the most important tips! You can potentially avoid bunions altogether by simply finding supportive shoes that truly fit your feet. Don’t settle for flimsy alternatives!

Talk to your foot doctor about orthotics - even if you don't have bunions, orthotics are a great way to help avoid developing them. Orthotics may even help with any other foot issues you have!

If you already have bunions, some of these tips may still help you. Wearing tight shoes will only make your bunion worse and cause you pain! If you notice an increase in pain or discomfort that doesn't go away, be sure to call Dr. Alan J. Discont, Dr. Gregory M. Krahn, and Dr. Boyd Andrews at 408-732-0033. Schedule an appointment today at our location in Chandler, Arizona.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
October 10, 2018
Category: Foot Pain
Tags: Arthritis   Exercise  

All our lives, we’ve been told that if we hurt something on our bodies or if we become sick, we should rest in order to heal and feel better. Did you know that while this is generally good advice, it doesn’t apply to everything and everyone? What if you sprained your ankle? Absolutely, rest is what the podiatrist would prescribe until you’re ready for physical rehabilitation! But when it comes to being diagnosed with arthritis and all of the painful aching and swelling that accompanies arthritis, do we rest to make ourselves feel better? You might be surprised, but the answer is no.

As it turns out, the pain, swelling, and discomfort that accompany arthritis in our feet or ankles can actually be soothed and reduced by regular physical activity. We know what you’re thinking - if you weren’t a jogger before being diagnosed with arthritis, you can’t imagine being one afterward! You don’t have to run a triathlon to help your arthritis pain. Here are some effective but low-impact activities to help you reduce pain related to arthritis:

Swimming - Want a full body workout without the full body impact? Get to your nearest swimming pool and swim the pain away!

Yoga - Gentle, slow, and relaxing, yoga is a peaceful alternative to high impact exercise. Reduce pain while you increase flexibility!

Stationary bike - It’s just like biking outdoors but you control the difficulty! You push with your feet, but the seated position prevents putting your full body weight on your feet and ankles.

Elliptical - The mechanics of an elliptical machine allow for a more gentle experience than a treadmill. Get all the benefits of jogging and walking without the pain and swelling!

Now that you have a better idea of what activities you can do to get fit, stay fit, and help reduce your arthritis pain all in one go - get out there and get active! Want some extra help along the way? Be sure to call Family Foot & Ankle Care at (408) 732-0033 to schedule an appointment with Dr. Alan J. Discont, Dr. Gregory M. Krahn, and Dr. Boyd Andrews at our location in Chandler, Arizona.

 

 

 

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
October 05, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Heel Pain   heel spurs  

Have you been experiencing any heel pain or bothersome tenderness without any obvious cause? Although heel spurs themselves sometimes do not cause acute discomfort, they are frequently associated with the painful inflammation known as plantar fasciitis, a condition commonly described as feeling like a knife is wrenching through your foot. Read below for more information on the typical causes, symptoms, and treatments of heel spurs.

What is a Heel Spur?

A heel spur is often the result of overstraining foot muscles and ligaments, overstretching the plantar fascia (the thick band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes), and repeatedly tearing the heel bone membrane. From these actions arises a calcium deposit on the underside of the heel bone. Risk factor for developing the condition include:

  • Possessing any walking gait abnormalities

  • Regularly running or jogging on hard surfaces

  • Wearing poorly fitted or overly worn shoes

  • Wearing shoes that lack arch support

  • Being excessively overweight or obese

What are The Symptoms?

Heel spurs do not carry many symptoms by themselves. However, they are often related to other afflictions, most typically plantar fasciitis. The most common sign of this combo of conditions is a feeling of chronic pain along the bottom or back of the heel, especially during periods of walking, running, or jogging. If you are experiencing this recurring inflammation, it is a good idea to visit your local podiatrist's office and inquire about undergoing an x-ray or ultrasound examination of the foot.

What are the Treatment Options?

The solutions to heel spurs are generally centered around decreasing inflammation and avoiding re-injury. They include:

  • Applying ice on the inflammation

  • Performing stretch exercises

  • Wearing orthotic devices or shoe inserts to relieve pressure off of the spur

  • Taking anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen to relieve pain

  • In extreme cases, surgery can be performed on chronically inflamed spurs

If you are dealing with symptoms of heel spurs or pain in your feet, turn to a podiatrist so that we can get you back on your feet. Don't ignore your pain.

By Family Foot & Ankle Care, PC
October 03, 2018
Tags: Shoes   feet and ankles   self-massage  

Of all the parts of our bodies, what parts move the most on a daily basis? It could be our hands, always grabbing and manipulating things in our environment. Maybe it’s our legs, constantly carrying us around everywhere we go. You might be surprised to know that really, out of all our body parts, our feet are the ones moving the most. Because our legs and hands involve tasks that we actively have to think about to complete, we might not realize just how much our feet and ankles do for us every day. This is why it’s so important to keep our feet happy, comfortable, and safe!

Shoes for the Occasion:

When you go out for the day, do you have the right kind of shoes to wear for what you’re doing? If you’re going shopping on a Sunday, it’s easy to think that a frilly pair of high heels will do your feet justice for hours of shopping.

Similarly, not every pair of sneakers is the right kind of sneakers for going to the gym or taking a walk. Think ahead about what you’re doing and pack an extra pair of more comfortable shoes as a backup!

Taking Care and NOT Overdoing It:

Planning a long day ahead can be fun and exciting, but have you ever thought about planning your breaks and time to rest in between? If not, now is the time to start.

During your next day trip, be sure to keep your inevitably aching feet in mind. Not only do frequent breaks help, but so will preparing the day before. For the night after:

  • Rest with your feet up for 15-20 minutes
  • Give yourself a self-massage
  • Soak in warm water and Epsom salts before bed

When you ask Dr. Alan J. Discont, Dr. Gregory M. Krahn, or Dr. Boyd Andrews from Family Foot & Ankle Care, there are dozens of more tips! But we felt these were two of the most important tips of them all. Go the extra mile for your foot and ankle health and call us today at (408) 732-0033 to schedule an appointment at our location in Chandler, Arizona.





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